542 Cab Forward Restoration

GMoose

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Need some help from the Tucker experts out there.

Does anyone know what aluminum alloy the fifth wheels are made of, and if any heat treatment was performed on them after casting.

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Track Addict

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Acts like cheap cast aluminum when I welded it. Don't think they got any type of heat treatment other than the hot pour.
 

GMoose

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Got the trunnion bearings back from my machinist friend, ready to weld in. Here are the old with the new.


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Also got the tunnion pin back, had to machine it down about .020" since the forward bearing was smaller than the rear one. This also cleaned the surfaces up a bit.


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GMoose

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Here they are ready to tack. Prior to this I assemble the fifth wheel onto the pinion shaft and bearings placed in the frame to make sure everything was aligned and clearances were good through the full rotation.

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GMoose

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All welded in (well not completely, later I turned the frame over and welded the bottoms also).

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GMoose

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Here are the new and old braces that go over the bearings. I made the new ones a little thicker and longer. I also made the new ones not quite as wide so I could have a better fillet weld to the original square tube.

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GMoose

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Here they are all welded in. Next will be to ream out the bearings back to size. Welding shrunk them, the amount oversized we guessed on was not enough to allow post-weld clearance, plus they are not as round as before. Adjustable reamer is on order, should be here next week. Once the trunion pin fits in the bearings I will drill and tap both bearings for the grease zerks.

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There should be plenty of material on this trunion support and rear frame area now to prevent breakage. Maybe a little excessive, but oh-well. I will just have to make sure the machine is moving prior to steering and it should last, I guess.
 

GMoose

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New seats came this week. Bought the ones for a 55 to 75ish jeep. Look to be fairly close. The one for the drivers side looked more like the 76 and later version, but I decided to go with the earlier version since the cat is a 66. Maybe the drivers seat was changed out at some time. It is obvious that the passenger seat was, it was a kitchen chair.

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GMoose

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OK, more help from the Tucker experts please. This is way premature but I need some help with the color of the stripes on the cab. I plan to paint the machine the original orange, but if you look at this old brochure you can see that the cab has three "racing" strips up and over the cab. Does anyone have an idea what color these strips might be. Thanks!

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Pontoon Princess

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they were Red !

but pretty sure yours did not have racing stripes, the machine in the photo, probably was the only one or two, ever to have the go slow stripes,
they are cool and look good, I myself would do the stripes, but wide ones, like from a '69 Camero





but you can always call Clyde, he is the man/expert with all the answers...
 
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GMoose

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they were Red !

but pretty sure yours did not have racing stripes, the machine in the photo, probably was the only one or two, ever to have the go slow stripes,
they are cool and look good, I myself would do the stripes, but wide ones, like from a '69 Camero





but you can always call Clyde, he is the man/expert with all the answers...


Well thanks. I also believe mine did not have them, nor the blade, but I might just add the stripes. Not sure on the width, I kind of like the ones in the pictures. Guess I have a lot of time to decide. Thanks again!!!
 

GMoose

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Now for the next Tucker expert question of the day:

The original storage box on the back behind the cab, was it made of aluminum or steel? Mine had one at one time, you can see where it was bolted on. It must have been destroyed then replaced with the shorter, but wider, one in these photos. I can determine the dimensions of the original box from the area on the frame where it was bolted and scale from the pictures, but if anyone knows exactly or has better photos then the ones above that would be great.

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Pontoon Princess

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no expert here, just a minion,

I have a 542 and the box is aluminum. fyi, not all cab forwards had the tool boxes.

it is too bad Clyde does not participate on the forums, he has all the factory records and would be able to answer these questions with some authority, it would be an asset to the collectors of tuckers
 

GMoose

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no expert here, just a minion,

I have a 542 and the box is aluminum. fyi, not all cab forwards had the tool boxes.

it is too bad Clyde does not participate on the forums, he has all the factory records and would be able to answer these questions with some authority, it would be an asset to the collectors of tuckers

I will make the new one from aluminum then. It is obvious to me that this one had the box, there is an opening in front of the plywood bed but behind the cab. And there are old bolt holes in the frame in this area. Thanks again for the help!
 

Pontoon Princess

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I will make the new one from aluminum then. It is obvious to me that this one had the box, there is an opening in front of the plywood bed but behind the cab. And there are old bolt holes in the frame in this area. Thanks again for the help!

as much as I like to restore to original specs, I would not put the box back on, but rather create a storage area in the coffin and have a hinged door in the floor of the flatbed, the coffin area is just wasted space, unless you take the fuel tanks out of the cab and built a custom tank in the coffin area, thus giving you more room in the cab, that would be the best choice IMHO.

thank you for posting the photos of the restoration.....
 

olympicorange

Active member
Here they are all welded in. Next will be to ream out the bearings back to size. Welding shrunk them, the amount oversized we guessed on was not enough to allow post-weld clearance, plus they are not as round as before. Adjustable reamer is on order, should be here next week. Once the trunion pin fits in the bearings I will drill and tap both bearings for the grease zerks.

View attachment 118266



There should be plenty of material on this trunion support and rear frame area now to prevent breakage. Maybe a little excessive, but oh-well. I will just have to make sure the machine is moving prior to steering and it should last, I guess.

………..'' over-kill' on upgrades for a wear/stress point is not necessarily a bad idea... usually a good plan,... but that old saying...'''the weakest link in the chain'''...scenario.... looks great ...:thumbup:
 

GMoose

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The adjustable reamer came this week so I was able to get the trunion bearings back to size and in alignment after welding. Took many cut, a few thousands at a time, long tedious job. Final results were very good. the spiral cut reamer worked very well. I built a tapered bushing to install into the bearing not being cut to align and stabilize the reamer, worked well.

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GMoose

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Here is the trunion pin installed (proof that the reamer worked). I am going to make a washer to go on the end where the angle head is attached (left side of this photo). The angle head (I am sure there is a better name for it) is welded to the shaft with a fillet weld. This fillet weld is basically a tapered wedge that gets pushed into the bearing inner diameter when the cat moves backwards. This has got to lock things up from rotating side-to-side, and introduce some forces I really don't want in the bearing. I am going to build a washer which will go over this area and give a flat bearing face which will carry the load between the face of the angle head to the face of the new bearing (basically span the fillet weld). Once I get it built I will show some photos. Hopefully this will do two things: 1) provide a flat thrust face for the loads, and 2) take up some of the slop in the pin, in the axial direction.

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