1989 Tucker 1644c

1boringguy

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Which freighter are you referring

I got to thinking about that last night. I thought I recalled reading an article where a freighter was lost in some of the Antarctica work after the CTAE, but Im thinking later that it wasn't a freighter. CRS, was there ever a freighter lost in Antarctica?
 

1boringguy

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Back to bussiness. Had the steering cylinder rebuilt since the rod had a large pit in it and seals seeped slightly. The rod was 7/8" but my hydraulic shop said 7/8" isn't all that common and they would have to order everything for that size. So we decided to go out to 1" rod size, for ease now and in the future. According to my calculations it's amounts to only about 3% difference in force when cylinder is being drawn/pushed inward. Doubt if that will be to noticeable when steering. As evidenced by the bare parts of the cylinder, as much as I would like to have everything possible powdercoated, some things just don't lend themselves to that because of heat intolerance or not ending up with areas coated that shouldn't be. Some spots will just have to be painted to match.
 

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Pontoon Princess

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Thanks PP,
No disrespect intended of course by my attempted humor.
love your humor and questions always welcome at the grand palace of all things pontoon

great job on sorting out and rebuilding your tucker, sadly a rubber track machine, snow cat

thank you for your interest, yes the Torpedo is the best cat on snow
 
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1boringguy

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Thanks PP,
Always appreciate the source of info.

And not everyone appreciates my humor, and sometimes I just put both feet in my mouth, but in the end always hoping for something like this;

"There is nothing like a gleam of humor to reassure you that a fellow human being is ticking inside a strange face." –Eva Hoffman
 

Track Addict

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The shop said my piston had odd sizing on it also which I inquired about replacement. Luckily good shape for hone polish and repack.

Key is figuring out the throw and centering the pivot. Build sheet had the specs that match my measuring.
 

1boringguy

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The shop said my piston had odd sizing on it also which I inquired about replacement. Luckily good shape for hone polish and repack.

Key is figuring out the throw and centering the pivot. Build sheet had the specs that match my measuring.
Yes I'm sure when I get to the assembly stage I'll have some questions about getting everything aligned properly. I think I recall seeing around here somewhere, where sno-drifter had posted some Tucker manufacturer info about alignment. Got a bit to do before I get there, but I'm gaining.
 

Blackfoot Tucker

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Yes I'm sure when I get to the assembly stage I'll have some questions about getting everything aligned properly. I think I recall seeing around here somewhere, where sno-drifter had posted some Tucker manufacturer info about alignment. Got a bit to do before I get there, but I'm gaining.
1BG,

Tucker, Inc puts out monthly newsletters, and while much of the info is applicable to the new, fancy, high-dollar machines, sometimes there are some great maintenance tips that apply to our "vintage" machines.

Here's a link to one such gem that explains in detail how to properly do an alignment:


I'll mention we are in the process of installing new tie rod ends on Snowzilla. It has been one of those less-than-fun jobs. On each tie rod there is one tie rod end with a right hand thread, and one with a left hand thread.

On the front tie rod we used a lot of heat, a three foot pipe wrench, and a long cheater bar (also referred to as a "Scott bar") and it was still a struggle to remove the tie rod end with the left hand thread. Neither Scott nor I had a 1"-14 left hand tap to clean up the threads in the tie rod before installing the new one. So I ordered a tap and it will arrive in a few days. Our plan is to temporarily install the tie rods, correct any alignment issues, and then remove the tie rods and repair the pipe wrench induced scars on the tie rod prior to priming and painting.

If you want to borrow that tap when we're done, shoot me a PM...
 

1boringguy

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1BG,

Tucker, Inc puts out monthly newsletters, and while much of the info is applicable to the new, fancy, high-dollar machines, sometimes there are some great maintenance tips that apply to our "vintage" machines.

Here's a link to one such gem that explains in detail how to properly do an alignment:


I'll mention we are in the process of installing new tie rod ends on Snowzilla. It has been one of those less-than-fun jobs. On each tie rod there is one tie rod end with a right hand thread, and one with a left hand thread.

On the front tie rod we used a lot of heat, a three foot pipe wrench, and a long cheater bar (also referred to as a "Scott bar") and it was still a struggle to remove the tie rod end with the left hand thread. Neither Scott nor I had a 1"-14 left hand tap to clean up the threads in the tie rod before installing the new one. So I ordered a tap and it will arrive in a few days. Our plan is to temporarily install the tie rods, correct any alignment issues, and then remove the tie rods and repair the pipe wrench induced scars on the tie rod prior to priming and painting.

If you want to borrow that tap when we're done, shoot me a PM...
Thanks BFT, thats precisely the info I'll need as I get to the alignment procedure. And thanks for the offer using the tap.

When I got this cat I noticed that on the front 5th wheel, the thread fit between the tie rod end and the tie rod was lose due to wear. I split the tie rod the length of the threads and put a clamp on it. I recall sno-drifter recommending the end be left unclamped so as to be free to rotate if encountering a bind and not break the tie rod end. I went ahead with the clamp and a new tie rod end anyway, which did a good job of tightening up the fit, for a couple reasons. My thought was that Tucker made this end upclamped (one of many changes Tucker made by the 1989 1644c model that deals with issues you guys have found of earlier years) but I wondered if that wasn't done as the 'standard', parts were already designed, made, ordered that way. And the 'standard ' being the front 5th wheel was the one that could turn and also rotate, but with a blade the front was made the non-rotating 5th wheel, which of course makes sense. On mine the rear tie rod is split and has clamps, as if it was meant to be the non-rotating end. Looks to me as if the 5th wheel that does rotate is the one that can create a bind on the tie rod end and break it, the fixed to the frame end, not so much. Anyway I greased up the threads on the rear tie rod and left the clamps semi-tight, and carry a spare tie rod end in the tool box on the cat, just in case. If I decide I need to have the front free of the clamp, the tie rod ends and tie rod (for a truck which would have to be cut/welded to proper length) seem to be available from Peterbilt or the local truck wrecking yard. Or borrow a tap and cut the treads in some heavy wall pipe 🙂
 

Track Addict

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I had the same loose tie rod issue that actually pulled out. Slit and clamped as a bandaid. Luckily it was in a parking lot close to tools and curious helpers. If it happened where the cat was 10 minutes prior would have been there for a bit.

Also had the front tie rod on the 442 break under way and pole vault the machine. The water fills and the front and rear table recess for the nuts. This tie end broke off right below the nut. This is probably rare but happened. Metal looked stressed/brittle.

Moving both a rubber and pontoon cat with only one table connected what's quite a show. Think Tucker Someday had a good laugh watching the security cam footage.

Davenet found a solution that works and should be the same for yours. Didn't have access to a big enough pass through lathe so we cut and welded the tubes to length. Plan was to cut the right hand threads off, drill, tap. I have the right hand drill and tap if needed also.

This link as the part numbers and info:https://www.forumsforums.com/3_9/threads/making-a-443-from-a-442-project.52430/page-7
 

1boringguy

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TA,

I did recall seeing photos of your temp in the field repair on the tie rod. Getting home with the problem, thats the main thing.

The tie rod on mine is basically made of two different tubes threaded each end, one right, one left. The bigger tube slides over the top of the smaller one and that is used to create the desired length, as I recall. Certainly a number of ways to accomplish the same thing, that was probably just the simplest, easiest, fit the most applications with the least inventory from a manufacturer standpoint. Just something to be aware of on these old cats, un-clamped it's asking a lot of those treads over time.
 

1boringguy

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Lucky, no failures and no damaged seats. But not reusing any of them.

Also if you ever had to replace a gear in the backcountry take a 14mm socket. The bolts take 9/16, but two of the sprockets didn't have the recesses for the socket machined into it. The only way to get them loose was beat a 14mm onto them, otherwise would have had to torch or grind them off.
 

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1boringguy

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Had gotten most all of the important engine parts except the cam. Word was there were no cam blanks being delivered and no word on when they might be. Shutdowns firing back up, could have been bad, but got the email yesterday that it shipped.

On the subject of cams ...... the 360 as a whole is at least second gen old school, adding some new tech like efi is an improvement of that old tech but no chance of ever keeping up 🙂. Anyway, thought this was pretty cool. Hyundai's version is all mechanical as explained, Koenigsegg's freevalve is a whole different approach that's fairly high tech, but probably farther out to adaptation.

 

sno-drifter

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Thanks for the schooling TA and PP, less embarrassing here than high centered in the snow on a hillside right 😉 As with most things successful, surely a combination of factors.

Ok PP, you're making this hard on me, no pontoons from the Belgium Tuckers then. So hear me out, if a P-38 can be recovered from the Greenland Ice Field after 50 years, maybe a Freighter can be recovered from a crevasse in Antarctica for some pontoons. I mean that would probably be easier than finding a good 543 cheap, right 🤔
The Freighter referred to here, County of Kent aka Rose, did in fact drop 100' in a crevasse. If you are going to recover it, bring your scuba gear as the crevasse was on the Ross Ice Shelf as I understand. After 61 years and Al Gores global wining, I'm betting she sits on the ocean floor.
 

1boringguy

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PP,
If I had gone a different route the Hemi might have been pretty appealing. Not sure of the fit of things like bell housings, hydraulic pump ect but horsepower, torque, weight, vvt, all look like a pretty good choice.

sno-drifter,

Figured the pontoons might be a little deformed by a moving ice field over the years, but hadn't thought about the bottom of the Antarctic Ocean as well. Starting to sound like it might be just about as easy to find a nice 543 instead 🤔
 
A Tucker 100 feet down a crevasse for 50 years would be flatter than a picture of it would be. Besides having been ground to pieces due to ice field movements. Little more than a memory at this point.
 
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