I miss my summer garden

NorthernRedneck

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I'm taking inspiration from your pictures with all the plants. We want to make a conscious effort to pretty up the deck with plants this summer.
 

FrancSevin

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Have you ever ever used milorganite? I use it on some hardy ferns, and they seem to love it. It stinks for about the first one to two days, but then smell dissipates.
I have used Milorganite for over 40 years. Great stuff.

It is pure organic.
There is good reason why it smells.

Do you know from what and where it originated?
The answer is hidden in the name.
 
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Ceee

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I have used Morganite for over 40 years. Great stuff.

It is pure organic.

Do you know from what and where it originated?
All I know is that it's poopy stuff. I don't care. It works. I put it on my lawn one time but was concerned about my neighbors complaining about the smell. Nobody ever said anything. Now I just use it sparingly on green only plants. It really is great stuff. Does it work on flowering plants?
 

FrancSevin

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All I know is that it's poopy stuff. I don't care. It works. I put it on my lawn one time but was concerned about my neighbors complaining about the smell. Nobody ever said anything. Now I just use it sparingly on green only plants. It really is great stuff. Does it work on flowering plants?
Milorganite was developed in the fifties as a lawn fertilizer. Back then, many homeowners accepted free delivery of it from the local sewage treatment plant dropped in bulk on their driveway to be spread out by the homeowner. Yeah, it stunk for weeks. But the greenest lawns on the block used it.

The city of Milwaukie got the bright idea to dry it out and bag it for retail sale. Hence the name Milorganite.

The packaging used to warn not to use it on food crops. I see no reason not to, as manure is the very same thing. And, we use it all the time on our food crop gardens.
 

Ceee

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Nice! Are those crepe myrtles that I see blooming?
My crepe myrtles seem to be okay, but I'm worried about my azaleas. Some seem to be okay, but some not so much.
 

FrancSevin

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Nice! Are those crepe myrtles that I see blooming?
My crepe myrtles seem to be okay, but I'm worried about my azaleas. Some seem to be okay, but some not so much.
No, I do have Crepe Myrtles but they are currently cut off at ground level having suffered the -15F cold last winter.

Those are Red Bud trees native to the Midwest. They bloom in spring. Crepe Myrtles bloom here in St Louis about late July and August.

I'm betting a lot of crepe Myrtles, even in Texas & Louisiana, are hurting.

Post 23 has my wild Plum blooming. After the Red Buds do their thing the tree next to the red Tulips blooms those beautiful white Dogwood blossoms. A large American Lilac sits under a big Walnut tree and is now blooming as well. Mid May the European Honey suckle fills the air with perfume blossoms.

I don't show it but I have a Bing cherry in bloom other side of the yard. Next to it is a Japanese Dogwood which waits until everyone else is done and can show off alone. From about mid March until midsummer, I have one tree or another in bloom

Your Azaleas should come back fine although blooms may be small or sparse. Give them a dose of Agricultural sulfur as soon
as you can along with some bloom buster from Miracle Grow. They have a liquid version (LiquaFeed (tm)) that works fast. Lowes carries it.
This should be done late February here in the Midwest, earlier in the south.

I am technically Zone 6 but at the northern extreme of it.

Where are you located?
 
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FrancSevin

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Grown, baby, grow

I did some research today after watching my cats eat the celery leaves. Turns out celery is good for cats. In fact you can cut stack pieces and feed it to them as treats.
Mine eat it whenever they have stomach issues. Good to know it is safe and even of benefit to them.

 

Ceee

Well-known member
I'm betting a lot of crepe Myrtles, even in Texas & Louisiana, are hurting.
Yeah, they have been hurting a little but not like the azaleas. I was thinking I was going to have to cut some of the azaleas back to the ground. I'm going to give them a little more time though. I'll have to check out the sulfur recommendation.


Where are you located?
East Texas
 

FrancSevin

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Yeah, they have been hurting a little but not like the azaleas. I was thinking I was going to have to cut some of the azaleas back to the ground. I'm going to give them a little more time though. I'll have to check out the sulfur recommendation.




East Texas
Then your Crepe Myrtle should be bruised but okay. Down there it grows to be graceful midsized trees. You might have some deadwood from the cold snap.

Here in St louis Crepe Myrtle is almost considered and annual.
 
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