542 Cab Forward Restoration

GMoose

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Here they are ready for reassembly. New seals and O-rings, all sand blasted and cleaned, straightened ball joint housings, piston rods were polished, honed the end of the cylinders where there was some surface rust (past the O-ring seal area).

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GMoose

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And done, ready for paint and install. Sure look a lot better now. Will even look better once painted.

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GMoose

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Here is the technical information I found for these rams and ball joints in case anyone else can use it.

Rams are Garrison 37281. Here is also the assembly figure and the assembly instructions. I mainly wanted the assembly instructions so I could determine how tight the plug on the end is to be tightened, which compresses the spring. The spring has a very high spring constant (2333 lb/in - Lee spring part number LHP 125H 01S is what I used) and can only compress about 3/32" before the mating components go metal to metal. The only instructions are "tighten plug until ball moves freely and without any bind", that is kind of arbitrary, but I will probably split the difference and compress the spring about half of the 3/32", ensuring the joint still moves freely without bind.

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Steering Ram Fig.jpg

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GMoose

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How does grease get to the ball 'cup' on the spring side?

Excellent question, I had the exact same thought. I even considered installing a grease zerk on the back side of each ball joint carrier so grease could be injected on the opposite side of the original zerk. This would have also required drilling a hole in the cone shaped insert which the spring sits in. I was not sure that even with these additions that grease would get to the bearing surface, it could just squeeze around the edge and out the opening. After finding the Dodge manual which has this steering ram assembly (see post a few back), and after seeing that the condition of the poorly maintained ball joint was still in very good condition, I decided to reassemble back the way it came originally. When I install the unit I will grease all sides very well. Probably something that should be taken apart routinely, inspected and regreased anyway (assuming I am not to lazy). Inspection is probably in order since two of the three springs (one was missing) were broken in half.
 

olympicorange

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Excellent question, I had the exact same thought. I even considered installing a grease zerk on the back side of each ball joint carrier so grease could be injected on the opposite side of the original zerk. This would have also required drilling a hole in the cone shaped insert which the spring sits in. I was not sure that even with these additions that grease would get to the bearing surface, it could just squeeze around the edge and out the opening. After finding the Dodge manual which has this steering ram assembly (see post a few back), and after seeing that the condition of the poorly maintained ball joint was still in very good condition, I decided to reassemble back the way it came originally. When I install the unit I will grease all sides very well. Probably something that should be taken apart routinely, inspected and regreased anyway (assuming I am not to lazy). Inspection is probably in order since two of the three springs (one was missing) were broken in half.

….. the ''ball seats'' have a lubrication hole in the center of each one , so range of motion, ''squeezes '' grease thru , just give it a couple pumps after each run.... the springs break from adjustment pre-loads torqued too high , and not backed off to spec.,.. usually in an attempt to take up ''steering slop'',...
 

GMoose

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Back to the transfer case. A couple pages back are some photos of it disassembled, removal of the races, and some damage identification where the center gear rubbed.

After removing the races from the other side, where the adjustment nuts are, more damage was found where the center bearing race resides.

At sometime the center bearing race adjusting nut must have backed off and slop had occurred. The loose bearing wore the aluminum case half so someone had used a punch to extrude some material so the race would be held. The adjusting nut also had some damage on the face which interfaces with the backside of the race.

You can see the damage in these photos:

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The nut on the left is the damaged one, you have to look real close to see it. The worst is from 12 to 3 o-clock position.

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GMoose

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My machinist friend, who is extreamly talented, took both halves of the case, set up on the half which had no damage so the exact center of the center bearing could be determined. Using this setup, he then set up on the bad half of the case and bored out the damaged area. He then made a flanged insert out of carbon steel which was slightly larger than the bore. He then pressed the new flanged insert into the aluminum case. This turned out extremely well in my opinion.

He then partially threaded the adjustment nut into the threads of the case and refaced the face of the nut so it would be perpendicular to the threads/bore of the case.

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Center nut is the repaired one, there is still a slight "witness" mark, but that will not affect the function, there is more than enough flat surface to interface with the bearing race. We did not want to remove anymore material than necessary.

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GMoose

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Everything cleaned, all threads chased, little things fixed or dressed up and ready for assembly. New bearings, new seals, new washers for 5/16 nuts, new washers for yokes, and new cotter pins.

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GMoose

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Prior to assembly I gathered the following information, from bearing manuals, other individuals, Tucker factory, and Youtube video (Tucker X-case assembly for a 2000XL). Posted it here just in case someday someone wants it. This is the information I used, I am not saying it is what anyone else would use, but it is what I used, and feel confident it will be sufficient.

View attachment Transfer Case Details.pdf

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GMoose

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On the front output shaft yoke the brake disk was dished, must have gotten hot at one time. We flattened it out, but I decided it would probably just dish again, so we made a new brake disk that is thicker in the mid section to help prevent the dishing. Here it is attached to the yoke, the old dish is next to it. Note that they are the same diameter, the image just makes it look like the original one is smaller.

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GMoose

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All assembled with the exception of the front output yoke nut was not torqued and the cotter pin was not installed permanently so I can take this yoke and brake disk off when I paint the transfer case.

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GMoose

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I have started to work on the 542CF again, I need to catch this thread up as to the work I now have completed. But for now I am getting prepared to rebuild the engine. All the machining has been completed and now I am rounding up the remaining parts for rebuild. Now if any of you have never tried to get parts for a Jeep OHC Tornado 230 straight 6 engine you know the challenge I have been working. But, I have found just about everything I needed and stole the rest from the spare engine that came with the cat when I purchased it.

So now the purpose of this post, I am short one key component, a fuel pump. The engine did not have a mechanical fuel pump, but it had been replaced with a plate covering the attachment hole and replaced with an electric pump. I know it is crazy to go back to the mechanical pump, but that is what I am doing so I can try to get the cat back to original. They no longer make or sell this fuel pump, and I have looked far and wide trying to find one (new or used). I do have one that came on the spare engine, but it is a fuel pump/vacumm pump combo which is not what I want. I have found a company that rebuilds these fuel pumps but I need to provide the pump to be rebuilt. I have a couple feelers out looking for one but nothing yet. So I ask any of you that may have a junk yard around that may have an old Willys or Jeep OHC 6-230 Tornado (1962 through 1965) that may still have the correct fuel pump on it I would appreciate the info.

The part number is 930144.

This is the one I need:

Fuel Pump 930144.jpg


This is the one I have:
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Blackfoot Tucker

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G Moose,

During part of my time in the USAF I was stationed in Southern Arizona. Being from Northern New England I was amazed at the number of rust free vehicles, and when I went to salvage yards things didn't really deteriorate (other than from sun exposure). There were a number of places that specialized in old(er) vehicles, some of which were brand-specific.

I don't know if you've looked at any of these, but this is where I would start:

 

GMoose

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G Moose,

During part of my time in the USAF I was stationed in Southern Arizona. Being from Northern New England I was amazed at the number of rust free vehicles, and when I went to salvage yards things didn't really deteriorate (other than from sun exposure). There were a number of places that specialized in old(er) vehicles, some of which were brand-specific.

I don't know if you've looked at any of these, but this is where I would start:

Thank you, I will take a look. Have a couple other promising leads I am working also. By the end of the day (month(s)) I will have a fuel pump.
 
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