• Please be sure to read the rules and adhere to them. Some banned members have complained that they are not spammers. But they spammed us. Some even tried to redirect our members to other forums. Duh. Be smart. Read the rules and adhere to them and we will all get along just fine. Cheers. :beer: Link to the rules: https://www.forumsforums.com/threads/forum-rules-info.2974/

ST4 restoration of Frankie the Frankentrac

Puckle

Well-known member
SUPER Site Supporter
Ha, yes, the pins are 20mm and the chassis tubing is 60x60mm - the whole snow-trac is a mix of metric and imperial threads/sizes just to keep us on our toes - you guys are the last hold out for inch measurements, when you succumb it will be so much easier for all of us!
 

Jphoenix

Well-known member
SUPER Site Supporter
Ha, yes, the pins are 20mm and the chassis tubing is 60x60mm - the whole snow-trac is a mix of metric and imperial threads/sizes just to keep us on our toes - you guys are the last hold out for inch measurements, when you succumb it will be so much easier for all of us!
Puckle, I spent 5 years in Brussels working for DHL managing their fleet of aircraft. I became fluent in metric - but the airplanes were all imperial and it had the effect of the technicians having to learn imperial while I learned metric, crazy old world we have here. I did have a very old Jag with some Whitworth, plus I have some screwdrivers that look like Phillips but aren't for the TR-6 I restored, I recall it was the screws on the Strombergs that needed that special non-Phillips Phillips head, can't recall the name of that type of screw?
 

Cidertom

Chionophile
GOLD Site Supporter
I have some screwdrivers that look like Phillips but aren't for the TR-6 I restored, I recall it was the screws on the Strombergs that needed that special non-Phillips Phillips head, can't recall the name of that type of screw?
one I've run into a couple of times:
Frearson screw drive, also known as the Reed and Prince screw drive. sharp point, wider angle. one size fits all.
 

Puckle

Well-known member
SUPER Site Supporter
Never heard of Reed & Prince but all cross head screws are crap because there are so many slightly different ones - Philips, pozidrive, JIS etc - should have just all gone for Torx.
 

Jphoenix

Well-known member
SUPER Site Supporter
Picked up the square channel I ordered as well as some 1/4” thick plate and 1.25” angle to replace the rusty angle that attach the sides of the body. Cut it all up and getting it squared for welding. Lots of sanding on the frame, lots more to go.

IMG_7107.jpeg
 

Sno-Surfer

Active member
Picked up the square channel I ordered as well as some 1/4” thick plate and 1.25” angle to replace the rusty angle that attach the sides of the body. Cut it all up and getting it squared for welding. Lots of sanding on the frame, lots more to go.

View attachment 171183
I'm curious with this set up how you will attach the springs and bogies without giving it a lift kit feel with the extra tubing added? Otherwise this looks a heck of a lot better than the original set up. You're really going to town on it!
 

Jphoenix

Well-known member
SUPER Site Supporter
The rectangular tube on the bottom is only for alignment and support while welding. It’s actually going to be used as a new front bumper, replacing the missing bumper.
 

Jphoenix

Well-known member
SUPER Site Supporter
I flipped the frame over and now I can weld the bottom of the new bogie support beam. I do plan to lift the machine - but only with an added 1/4" plate welded to the bottom of both bogie support beams because that long 3/8" plate that spans the width of the frame ends right where the bogies are attached - seems like a weak design, so I'm welding this plate onto the bottom of the bogie support beam to help carry the upward load into the long span wise beam. Also added the track support wheel frame hole backup plates to the aft side of the new beam.

IMG_7112.JPG


IMG_7117.JPG


IMG_7122.JPG


Mig welding in mesh-topped sneakers = not smart. I though I could get away with it :rolleyes:

Also going to add a couple of angles to the side corners of where the beam attaches to the frame - another stress point that needs some beef.

Next I'll flip it back right side up and weld on the new 1.25" angles that attach to the body sides with the 1/4-20 bolts.
 

Aklynxhunter

New member
I flipped the frame over and now I can weld the bottom of the new bogie support beam. I do plan to lift the machine - but only with an added 1/4" plate welded to the bottom of both bogie support beams because that long 3/8" plate that spans the width of the frame ends right where the bogies are attached - seems like a weak design, so I'm welding this plate onto the bottom of the bogie support beam to help carry the upward load into the long span wise beam. Also added the track support wheel frame hole backup plates to the aft side of the new beam.

View attachment 171254

View attachment 171255

View attachment 171256

Mig welding in mesh-topped sneakers = not smart. I though I could get away with it :rolleyes:

Also going to add a couple of angles to the side corners of where the beam attaches to the frame - another stress point that needs some beef.

Next I'll flip it back right side up and weld on the new 1.25" angles that attach to the body sides with the 1/4-20 bolts.
Been enjoying watching your thread. Awesome work you been doing. We slide a piece of 2" tubing full length inside the original tubing to stiffen it up. My frame and suspension is about ready to get powdercoated. You are on a ready pace with yours. Look forward to seeing your progeess.
 

Cidertom

Chionophile
GOLD Site Supporter
We slide a piece of 2" tubing full length inside the original tubing to stiffen it up.
It seems there were two versions of the mount. mine, like Jims is welded to a solid siderail. I've seen one where the tube was solid and the frame was welded. IDK if the change happened with the big wheel / 3 band or some other point.
 

Aklynxhunter

New member
It seems there were two versions of the mount. mine, like Jims is welded to a solid siderail. I've seen one where the tube was solid and the frame was welded. IDK if the change happened with the big wheel / 3 band or some other point.
Not sure. Im working on a 63 2 band.
 

Attachments

  • 20231129_153904.jpg
    20231129_153904.jpg
    1.2 MB · Views: 27

Jphoenix

Well-known member
SUPER Site Supporter
Got the bogie mounts done, backup plates welded in place, body frame rails welded on - but now I'm looking at the trans mount C channel thinking it needs to be replaced. It's bent and pretty rusty in the middle, so while I'm in there might as well just do it.

IMG_7127.JPG


IMG_7129.JPG


IMG_7131.JPG


IMG_7134.JPG
 

Jphoenix

Well-known member
SUPER Site Supporter
Not sure. Im working on a 63 2 band.
Looks different - if that is the bottom surface (frame upside down?) then I don't see the 3/8" thick steel strap welded to the bottom of my centrer channel. So, maybe your bogie support channel goes all the way through the frame? Seems like that's a better way of doing it - just welding the tube onto the side of the frame channel wasn't smart in my opinion, and that's probably why mine cracked where it did - big stress riser where the tube ends and the big thick strap ends there too, all the load going through one weld joint - that's why I added the 1/4" plate to the bottom of mine. I think yours is built differently.
 

Aklynxhunter

New member
Looks different - if that is the bottom surface (frame upside down?) then I don't see the 3/8" thick steel strap welded to the bottom of my centrer channel. So, maybe your bogie support channel goes all the way through the frame? Seems like that's a better way of doing it - just welding the tube onto the side of the frame channel wasn't smart in my opinion, and that's probably why mine cracked where it did - big stress riser where the tube ends and the big thick strap ends there too, all the load going through one weld joint - that's why I added the 1/4" plate to the bottom of mine. I think yours is built differently.
Thats correct. Its upside down.
 

Jphoenix

Well-known member
SUPER Site Supporter
Big milestone today - got first coat of POR-15 on the frame top. First I had to finish welding and fitting the from axle housings to the new pivot bushings and decided not to replace the trans mount channel, just straighten it out. So, I hooked up the come-along and cleaned all the rust out of the rust pockets on the top channel, pulled the channel straight and welded up all the rust pockets with the mig machine. That had the effect of getting the channel red hot and when I released the come-along, the channel had taken a set right where it needed to be.

IMG_7140.JPG


IMG_7144.JPG


IMG_7147.JPG


Then more sanding, wire-wheeling and then finally the paint goes on. I'll flip it tomorrow and put a first coat on the bottom. Two coats of POR is required, then reassembly is the reverse of the disassembly procedure.

IMG_7153.JPG
 

KickerM

Active member
Site Supporter
GOLD Site Supporter
Very Impressive and I’m taking many notes and really appreciate your detail on this as I have a SnowMaster to start on…but one project at a time and I must finish the FamCat before the SnowMaster…Although I did acquire a motor over the weekend;)
 

georgeofdesert

Member
GOLD Site Supporter
Also following with great interest. Someone in the past (PP?) mentioned sloshing linseed oil inside tubing to prevent rust. I did find water inside one of the tube sections of a chain tensioner.
 

Jphoenix

Well-known member
SUPER Site Supporter
POR15 instructions recommend two coats, so I started with a gray coat, and finished with black. The contrast helped ensure that I wouldn't miss any spots. I learned that from reading Ed Hollingsworth's blog on his TR6 restoration when I was restoring my TR6. Here's a link to his site, his restoration work is amazing because he does absolutely everything himself and does things like fabricating a new wood steering wheel from scratch - it's a true rabbit hole you can get lost in for hours: For a little more, you can do it yourself.

IMG_7163.JPG



When POR dries, it is thick (with 2 coats) and sets up very hard, so I have to chase all the internal and external threads and clean the hardened drips off mating surfaces, but it's really tough stuff. Cleaning and prep is also time-consuming with grinding and wire wheeling and sanding, then degreaser and metal prep, but it's worth the time and effort.
 

Jphoenix

Well-known member
SUPER Site Supporter
Flipped the frame back upright so I can paint the top side red and get ready for reassembling the wheels, etc. All drive components cleaned and painted, next step is to bring the bogies in, disassemble, clean and paint and then put the frame back on its wheels :)

IMG_7164.JPG


IMG_7167.JPG
 

Cidertom

Chionophile
GOLD Site Supporter
No one can say you're not moving right along with this project. WOW, fast and complete. Normally those two are exclusive of each other, but you doing it!
 

Jphoenix

Well-known member
SUPER Site Supporter
No one can say you're not moving right along with this project. WOW, fast and complete. Normally those two are exclusive of each other, but you doing it!
Thanks Tom, I’m enjoying the work, and the warm weather we’re having, paint dries faster!
 
Top