Not much food got canned this year

m1west

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
My business is food processing equipment. I work in all the local can plants and canneries and some not so local. the season that normally lasts until late October, is done now. Seems the farmers only planted around 40% of normal, due to water. Newsome is paying them not to farm. Couple miles from my home, someone just tore out around a thousand acres of almond trees, just planted a few years ago. Im sure this is going on in other places as well. I would stock up.
 

Melensdad

Jerk in a Hawaiian Shirt & SNOWCAT Moderator
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
We have restocked. Something goes on sale, we buy extra. Prices are NOT coming down, they are going to double. Food will still be available in the USA, even if quality goes down for most, but in poorer nations there will be famine, there will be food riots.
 

bczoom

Super Moderator
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
For my personal use, I'm doing a fair amount of canning (mostly tomatoes). Actually doing some today, after the F1 race.
High heat didn't help the tomatoes any but now that the high heat is gone and it's raining with normal frequency, they're coming back.
With the weather calming down, I'm now picking around 500 tomatoes per week of of 36 plants.
 

m1west

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
For my personal use, I'm doing a fair amount of canning (mostly tomatoes). Actually doing some today, after the F1 race.
High heat didn't help the tomatoes any but now that the high heat is gone and it's raining with normal frequency, they're coming back.
With the weather calming down, I'm now picking around 500 tomatoes per week of of 36 plants.
We have tomato famine this year, I think from the heat, been extra hot all summer. Its September and this week and next week are the hottest so far. last week everyday 100, this week and part of next week 7 days 107 or hotter with 112 tomorrow and 115 on Tuesday. And finally drops off next Saturday.
 

Umberto

Well-known member
Our tomatoes are slow to come on but have plenty and more to come. There is so much we can do with them.
we’ve been eating canned meats from two years ago and enjoying it. I’ll do more once the weather cools down.
 

Melensdad

Jerk in a Hawaiian Shirt & SNOWCAT Moderator
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
Largely do to food shortages and increasing food prices, we are seriously considering adding a greenhouse addition to the back wall of the workshop. I could easily add a 20' long greenhouse and I've looked into hydroponics systems as well as soil based systems. While aquaponics has some advantages as it also produces protein in the form of fish, I don't really want to go into something quite so complicated as aquaponics. If we build the greenhouse I would lean toward hydroponics.
 

Gary O'

Well-known member
Canning shelves are maxed
The three freezers are all but full

Had bumper crops in the raised beds this year
Planting carrots, potatoes, other root crops right now

Yeah, food prices
Weeks ago my lady said 'I'm never paying THAT price!'
Told her 'no, no you won't.....if you wait'
 

bczoom

Super Moderator
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
Our tomatoes are slow to come on but have plenty and more to come.
We quit on the tomatoes. Mrs. Z picked about 700 a couple weeks ago. Instead of ripening, they're going straight to rotting.
I look in the garden at the tomato section. There's probably a couple thousand there right now. And that's where they'll lay.
We did can tomatoes (juiced, not sliced/quartered) in 5 batches this year for a total of just over 60 quarts.
 

power1

Active member
Largely do to food shortages and increasing food prices, we are seriously considering adding a greenhouse addition to the back wall of the workshop. I could easily add a 20' long greenhouse and I've looked into hydroponics systems as well as soil based systems. While aquaponics has some advantages as it also produces protein in the form of fish, I don't really want to go into something quite so complicated as aquaponics. If we build the greenhouse I would lean toward hydroponics.
Aquaponics is a lot less complicated than hydroponics. With aquaponics all you have to do is throw out a little fish food every once in a while. With hydroponics you have to do all of the testing and adding fertilizer.
Personally I decided going into raised beds was the best and a lot easier.
 

Melensdad

Jerk in a Hawaiian Shirt & SNOWCAT Moderator
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
I've been looking at the closed system hydroponics, there is some testing, but not a lot. At least it doesn't look like it is any more difficult than balancing pool PH. And the nutrients seem to be widely available, organic and chemical. At least from what I can see. I get the advantage of the protein source outcome from aquaponics, but that would require more space and I'd rather use the space I have, IF WE BUILD the lean to greenhouse, for tomatoes, cukes, peppers, strawberries, etc. Still very undecided.

And the lovely Mrs_Bob also wants chickens. I may have to draw the line in the sand at chickens. I don't want to deal with a flock of birds.
 

power1

Active member
I've been looking at the closed system hydroponics, there is some testing, but not a lot. At least it doesn't look like it is any more difficult than balancing pool PH. And the nutrients seem to be widely available, organic and chemical. At least from what I can see. I get the advantage of the protein source outcome from aquaponics, but that would require more space and I'd rather use the space I have, IF WE BUILD the lean to greenhouse, for tomatoes, cukes, peppers, strawberries, etc. Still very undecided.

And the lovely Mrs_Bob also wants chickens. I may have to draw the line in the sand at chickens. I don't want to deal with a flock of birds.
I have between 100 and 200 chickens. I am working on my own breed.
 

m1west

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
I have between 100 and 200 chickens. I am working on my own breed.
We just started chickens, we got Easter Eggers, they are about 4 weeks now. I never realized the difficulty and expense of the coop and run set up to keep out predators. We only got 6
 

power1

Active member
We just started chickens, we got Easter Eggers, they are about 4 weeks now. I never realized the difficulty and expense of the coop and run set up to keep out predators. We only got 6
Just like anything else, there is a start up cost. I don't care for the easter eggers, can't tell what you are really getting. Can't tell what they are crossed with.
 

Gary O'

Well-known member
I never really plant much
I'm pretty much the raised bed builder, and hauler of dirt

but

Some things I do plant
Things I get a hankering for
Wunna those things is green onions

I planted some
Like 'em in my salads and just by themselves...dab in a bit of salt

Pulled a few for me and my buds

Got the glower

Guess my lady had other plans

Big onions
Big sweet onions

I yielded
Went back to hauling dirt

They are good
aaaand kinda cool when hanging

onions hanging.jpg
 

power1

Active member
I never really plant much
I'm pretty much the raised bed builder, and hauler of dirt

but

Some things I do plant
Things I get a hankering for
Wunna those things is green onions

I planted some
Like 'em in my salads and just by themselves...dab in a bit of salt

Pulled a few for me and my buds

Got the glower

Guess my lady had other plans

Big onions
Big sweet onions

I yielded
Went back to hauling dirt

They are good
aaaand kinda cool when hanging

View attachment 155467
I am trying out the multiplying onions. I really don't eat much I grow but like to see plants growing.
 

m1west

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
Just like anything else, there is a start up cost. I don't care for the easter eggers, can't tell what you are really getting. Can't tell what they are crossed with.
We got them because they come from South America and do well in the heat, its 100+ from the end of June thru August. Plus the wife likes the egg colors. Where we bought them they were recommended for this area.
 

power1

Active member
We got them because they come from South America and do well in the heat, its 100+ from the end of June thru August. Plus the wife likes the egg colors. Where we bought them they were recommended for this area.
They are just a cross breed nixed chicken. People who are selling them have all kinds of stories about them but, like a used car salesman, their stories can't be believed. They came from South America probably a few hundred years ago. Just a sales gimmick. They take am Americana rooster and breed it to any other breed of chicken they can find and call them easter egger mainly because no one knows what color egg they will lay. Could be white, brown, green, and maybe blue. Most of the time the color does not even go all the way through the egg shell. You can wash the color off and they will be the same as all whgite eggs.
 

power1

Active member
How do you go about doing that? Not being a smart ass or anything.
It is a pretty long process. You have to have chickens that are different from known breeds. They have to be able to produce chicks that look exactly like them. There has to be a certain amount of them and there has to be several different people who have raised them for a certain amount of time. I am not going to make them a breed but will be leaving my place and the chickens ready to be made a breed to someone else and let them decide on a name and be the start of a new breed.
 
Top