Gonna build some basement shelves

jpr62902

Jeanclaude Spam Banhammer
SUPER Site Supporter
Nuttin fancy. 2x4 legs and frame, 1/2 inch osb shelf. I want to attach the 2x4's to the concrete walls, but not sure which method would work best. Powder actuated probably won't work as this is a 100 year old foundation. I'm debating between 3/8 x 4" sleeve anchors and 1/4 x 4" Tapcons. Any preference or other suggestions?
 

bczoom

Super Moderator
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
I normally use tapcons.

How damp is your basement? Wood shelves hold moisture and start to get a mildew smell after awhile.

I was going to build some shelves myself but after looking at cost to build vs. buy, I just bought some (similar to what's pictured below).

For the shelves themselves, particle board sucks (sags under weight), OSB is better, regular plywood is better yet but 1-by-12" pine holds the most without sagging.

Industrial-Shelving3-large.jpg
 

Doc

Administrator
Staff member
I used Gorilla Glue to attach 2x4's to the basement wall and have been very impressed with how well that has held. I much prefer that to drilling holes in the basement walls and appears to be stronger all the way around.
I tried to remove one and gave up, was not worth the effort.
 

JEV

Mr. Congeniality
GOLD Site Supporter
Bczoom and I are thinking alike in this regard. I like the Tapcon fasteners, but I also like adjustable shelving that can be reconfigured if need be, and that can be easily relocated if the use of the space changes. My only permanent shelving is in my garage, because that's where all of my work stuff is stored. The shelving there was designed to hold specific stuff, and I also have one 4' x 2' x 6' high adjustable shelving unit that can, and has been twice, relocated for hardware items.

There...now we've answered your question & given you something else to second-guess yourself about. :yum:
 

jpr62902

Jeanclaude Spam Banhammer
SUPER Site Supporter
Believe me, I'm all about utility, but I also need some somewhat stout permanent shelving in one corner. I'm using lumber from a support column replacement project I just completed. All I need are a few 1/2" sheets of 4 x 8 OSB ($7.50 each) and the hardware, so not expensive at all.

Looks like I'll go the Tapcon route. I could see using Gorilla glue in new(er) concrete, but not on my peeling foundation. I just wouldn't be able to trust it.
 

Kane

New member
Believe me, I'm all about utility, but I also need some somewhat stout permanent shelving in one corner. I'm using lumber from a support column replacement project I just completed. All I need are a few 1/2" sheets of 4 x 8 OSB ($7.50 each) and the hardware, so not expensive at all.

Looks like I'll go the Tapcon route. I could see using Gorilla glue in new(er) concrete, but not on my peeling foundation. I just wouldn't be able to trust it.

If you haven't purchased the plywood yet, you may want to go with at least 5/8" ply. Just my opinion. Depending upon the span, you might be disappointed with sagging 1/2" board loaded up with buckets of paint.
 

rlk

Bronze Member
GOLD Site Supporter
If you haven't purchased the plywood yet, you may want to go with at least 5/8" ply. Just my opinion. Depending upon the span, you might be disappointed with sagging 1/2" board loaded up with buckets of paint.

I'll second this. You can get by with 1/2" if you have plenty of support underneath. In my opinion, 1/2" should not span over 16". With 5/8" you can get by with 24" span.

Bob
 

JEV

Mr. Congeniality
GOLD Site Supporter
Pay attention to which side of the OSB you want exposed...smooth or traction side. Traction side can be a PIA when trying to slide heavy boxes into place, or removing from storage.

I have a shelving unit 24" deep by 8' wide covered with 1/2" OSB in my garage. There is a lot of crapola on these shelves with zero deflection. Back wall is 1x4, front and side framing is 2x4 with drywall screws. The 8' unit only has end framing and is attached at the center post, and I have zero sag with the 1/2" OSB shelving that is held down with 1-1/4" drywall screws. OSB is pretty darn tough, and screwing it in place every 12" or so will keep it flat and add to the rigidity of the shelf unit.
 

Attachments

  • Garage shelving.jpg
    Garage shelving.jpg
    68.4 KB · Views: 42

jpr62902

Jeanclaude Spam Banhammer
SUPER Site Supporter
Pay attention to which side of the OSB you want exposed...smooth or traction side. Traction side can be a PIA when trying to slide heavy boxes into place, or removing from storage.

I have a shelving unit 24" deep by 8' wide covered with 1/2" OSB in my garage. There is a lot of crapola on these shelves with zero deflection. Back wall is 1x4, front and side framing is 2x4 with drywall screws. The 8' unit only has end framing and is attached at the center post, and I have zero sag with the 1/2" OSB shelving that is held down with 1-1/4" drywall screws. OSB is pretty darn tough, and screwing it in place every 12" or so will keep it flat and add to the rigidity of the shelf unit.

Holy crap, that's alotta crap!!! Exactly what I was thinking as far as design goes -- except I might put the rough side up so my crap doesn't slide off during an earthquake.:w00t2:

Thanks to all for the helpful responses!:clap:
 

JEV

Mr. Congeniality
GOLD Site Supporter
Holy crap, that's alotta crap!!! Exactly what I was thinking as far as design goes -- except I might put the rough side up so my crap doesn't slide off during an earthquake.:w00t2:

Thanks to all for the helpful responses!:clap:
Keep in mind that I'm operating a Handyman business out of my garage, and it's all "stuff" that I use...really no junk there at all.:clap:
 

jpr62902

Jeanclaude Spam Banhammer
SUPER Site Supporter
Keep in mind that I'm operating a Handyman business out of my garage, and it's all "stuff" that I use...really no junk there at all.:clap:

Believe me, I get it. I'm the family (not so) handyman and a firm believer in DIY. I also have a strong sense of "you never know when you're gonna need that."
.
 

bczoom

Super Moderator
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
Oh my. If JEV has too much "stuff" I'm screwed.

But then again, even with ongoing updates and fixes around the place, I haven't been in a HD/Lowes or other type of house store in over a year. OK, Lowes, once to pick up a new hot water tank... on warranty.
 

jwstewar

Active member
I build a set of basements shelves similar to this: http://robroy.dyndns.info/shelves/ I did this probably the winter of 2009, our first year in the house. They have worked great. Very strong, no sagging or anything and they have tons of stuff on them. I'm even able to sit on them or even climb the front of them. Nothing was attached to the floor or the concrete poured walls. If I were to build again, I wouldn't consider anything but this design.
 

Kane

New member
I build a set of basements shelves similar to this: http://robroy.dyndns.info/shelves/ I did this probably the winter of 2009, our first year in the house. They have worked great. Very strong, no sagging or anything and they have tons of stuff on them. I'm even able to sit on them or even climb the front of them. Nothing was attached to the floor or the concrete poured walls. If I were to build again, I wouldn't consider anything but this design.

Actually, the geometry of this support detail is pretty slick ... with lot's & lot's a' glue.



Notice that this system used 5/8" man-made planks for the shelving. Could be debated.
 

jpr62902

Jeanclaude Spam Banhammer
SUPER Site Supporter
I build a set of basements shelves similar to this: http://robroy.dyndns.info/shelves/ I did this probably the winter of 2009, our first year in the house. They have worked great. Very strong, no sagging or anything and they have tons of stuff on them. I'm even able to sit on them or even climb the front of them. Nothing was attached to the floor or the concrete poured walls. If I were to build again, I wouldn't consider anything but this design.

That's a great design if you have the workshop space to fabricate all those parts. Sadly, I do not.:sad:
 

jwstewar

Active member
I didn't taper the 1x4s, I just tapered the 2x2s, that was simple using a miter saw. An $89 miter saw would do those cuts quite quickly and easily.
 

JEV

Mr. Congeniality
GOLD Site Supporter
That's a great design if you have the workshop space to fabricate all those parts. Sadly, I do not.:sad:
I agree. Way too many component parts of special design, plus, if it weren't for all the glue, this design wouldn't be capable of holding a fraction of the load most people put on home built shelving. I built my 16' of shelving in 5 hours without help, once I got the material on site. The way mine is built, it can be taken apart and relocated or the material repurposed. Once glue is used as a fastener, there is no reusing the material or reconfiguring the unit. I'm a big fan of drywall screws for flexibility.
 
Top