Smart Kids are being held back by our public schools

Melensdad

Jerk in a Hawaiian Shirt & SNOWCAT Moderator
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
This is actually not shocking news that smart kids are being held back.

What is shocking is that so many kids are testing above their grade level and we are literally holding back a much larger % of students than what might previously had been guessed. We are holding back a substantial number of students just so the feelings of the lower performing students are not hurt? I do recall, when the lovely Mrs_Bob was still a teacher, that initially only the top performing kids were allowed into the "Advance Placement" classes in her school, eventually they started letting in anyone, including the mentally disabled, into those classes, which held back the entire class.

Please read the article at Intellectual Takeout from the link below. It cites research from Johns Hopkins University, there are charts at the link.


In summarizing the data from all of the tests, the researchers declared:

“[W]e estimate that 20-40% of elementary and middle school students perform at least one grade level above their current grade in reading, with 11-30% scoring at least one grade level above in math.”

And there is this tidbit:

“The basic principle of the new education is to be that dunces and idlers must not be made to feel inferior to intelligent and industrious pupils. That would be ‘undemocratic’. … Children who are fit to proceed to a higher class may be artificially kept back, because the others would get a trauma … by being left behind. The bright pupil thus remains democratically fettered to his own age-group throughout his school career….”
 

Ceee

Well-known member
Site Supporter
“[W]e estimate that 20-40% of elementary and middle school students perform at least one grade level above their current grade in reading, with 11-30% scoring at least one grade level above in math.”
"Such startling findings lead the Johns Hopkins team to wonder if the U.S. needs to reconsider its age-segregated education system."
......
I don't like the idea of holding kids back who are capable of learning more and probably would learn more in a more advanced class. I don't know what the answer to the problem is. I don't think age should be the only criteria, but I do think maturity level should be considered too.

Let's just say that a 7th grader is just over-the-top smart and is truly ready for an 8th grade advanced class. He/she is moved up and allowed to take that 8th grade class. What happens the next year if the 9th grade class is on a different campus? Do you make that child sit through that 8th grade class again? If not, who is responsible for transporting that child to the other campus (school system?), or does the school system have to pay another teacher to go to the middle school campus to teach those over-the-top kids for one or two classes per day?

I'm not arguing. I just see some logistical problems in the whole thing.


the lovely Mrs_Bob was still a teacher, that initially only the top performing kids were allowed into the "Advance Placement" classes in her school,
Where I taught the students had to have test scores showing that they were working above grade level to get into the advanced classes.

eventually they started letting in anyone, including the mentally disabled, into those classes, which held back the entire class.
I never experienced this situation.
 

Melensdad

Jerk in a Hawaiian Shirt & SNOWCAT Moderator
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
Where I taught the students had to have test scores showing that they were working above grade level to get into the advanced classes.


I never experienced this situation.
I was a decision by her school district. It is one of the reasons she left that school and went to a different district.
 
Top