Track frame profile

Cletis

New member
Realizing that the flatter the track profile contacting the snow provides a lower lbs psi.

What's your thoughts on a curved track frame for possibly quicker/easier steering like what they use on say fourwheelers?

I wonder if Tucker has ever done any testing with curved track frames or why some of the two track machines haven't tried something similar to the snow tracs?

Cletis
 

Cletis

New member
Thinking a bit more about it, I bet the two track machines might porpoise much worse with track frames a bit more curved. I've never rode a fourwheeler to know how they handle.

Cletis
 

300 H and H

Bronze Member
GOLD Site Supporter
Cletis, I wonder if Thiokol used the high centered grouser for this reason. They kept the track frame straight, so it wouldn't porpose, yet reduced contact area when on hard surfaces, for less stress when turning. A high centered grouser is alway a good idea, but those 601 's really have high centers. Snow tracs have only about 1/2" high spot then a 1/4" drop to a mid height, then down to the lowest outsides of the grouser. On hard surfaces you only have about a 4" wide surface on the ground...

Regards, Kirk
 

300 H and H

Bronze Member
GOLD Site Supporter
Cletis,

What about a track frame that could articulate when needed? Then it would return under spring tension, to it's orginal straight position? The top of the track woud loose tension, unless that were addressed...

Regards, Kirk
 

Cletis

New member
would have to straighten when tracking in a straight line and articulate/curve when turning
 

300 H and H

Bronze Member
GOLD Site Supporter
No I am thinking in a vertical plane, not bending the tracks...At the hard bar, make the frame so it can bend up or down relative to the front or back half. It would make crossing creeks nicer, and topping a ridge nicer as well... The tracks stay straight, you mearly let the middle flex in the track frame. I hope you see what I mean...

Regards, Kirk
 

Snowtrac Nome

member formerly known as dds
GOLD Site Supporter
imp's and bombies rock and roll pretty bad as they get longer the porpose effect isn't as bad. skidoo uses the same system as the snow trac's on the older scandic long tracks where the rear section is turned up a bit, you will still have full contact in deep snow I believe the reason tucker doesn't use it is that with an articulated steering system it's not needed like mattracks that steer with a system intended for round tires remember the bv 206 also articulates and also has a flat track profile.
 

redsqwrl

Bronze Member
SUPER Site Supporter
No I am thinking in a vertical plane, not bending the tracks...At the hard bar, make the frame so it can bend up or down relative to the front or back half. It would make crossing creeks nicer, and topping a ridge nicer as well... The tracks stay straight, you mearly let the middle flex in the track frame. I hope you see what I mean...

Regards, Kirk


Kirk wouldn't that make the track loose?
 

Snowtrac Nome

member formerly known as dds
GOLD Site Supporter
google up Christy suspension you may be surprised track tension isn't that critical
 

Snowtrac Nome

member formerly known as dds
GOLD Site Supporter
Christy as in walter Christy not krusty . Walt invented a long travel torsion style suspension for tanks in ww2 the US wouldn't take his concept serious but the Russians did ,and the Russians whooped the germans asses with mobility in their tanks the princapale were a loose fitting track and a long travel suspension
 

Cletis

New member
Interesting. So that's where the howe brothers got there tank suspension design. Their's is just a bit upgraded but looks very similar.

Not sure a cat would need that much suspension though.
 

Snowtrac Nome

member formerly known as dds
GOLD Site Supporter
here's some cool bt-7 footage can't understand a word of what they say but the footage is cool

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlUZzFUIKS4"]Легкий танк БТ 7 - YouTube[/ame]
 
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