Some evidence shows Type 2 diabetes is a reversible condition

Loudmouth

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A body of research of people with Type 2 diabetes has confirmed the underlying causes of the condition and established that it is reversible.

Professor Roy Taylor at Newcastle University, UK has spent almost four decades studying the condition and will present an overview of his findings at the European Association For The Study Of Diabetes (EASD 2017) in Lisbon.

In the talk he will be highlighting how his research has revealed that for people with Type 2 diabetes:
• Excess calories leads to excess fat in the liver
• As a result, the liver responds poorly to insulin and produces too much glucose
Excess fat in the liver is passed on to the pancreas, causing the insulin producing cells to fail
• Losing less than 1 gram of fat from the pancreas through diet can re-start the normal production of insulin, reversing Type 2 diabetes
This reversal of diabetes remains possible for at least 10 years after the onset of the condition

The body of research by Professor Roy Taylor now confirms his Twin Cycle Hypothesis - that Type 2 diabetes is caused by excess fat actually within both liver and pancreas.

This causes the liver to respond poorly to insulin. Simultaneously, excess fat in the liver increases the normal process of export of fat to all tissues. In the pancreas, this excess fat causes the insulin producing cells to fail.

The study showed a profound fall in liver fat content resulting in normalization of hepatic insulin sensitivity within 7 days of starting a very low calorie diet in people with type 2 diabetes.

"The good news for people with Type 2 diabetes is that our work shows that even if you have had the condition for 10 years, you are likely to be able to reverse it by moving that all important tiny amount of fat out of the pancreas. At present, this can only be done through substantial weight loss", Professor Taylor adds.

Professor Taylor explained the science behind the mechanisms: "Work in the lab has shown that the excess fat in the insulin producing cell causes loss of specialized function. The cells go into a survival mode, merely existing and not contributing to whole body wellbeing. Removal of the excess fat allows resumption of the specialized function of producing insulin. The observations of the clinical studies can now be fully explained."

He added: "Surprisingly, it was observed that the diet devised as an experimental tool was actually liked by research participants. It was associated with no hunger and no tiredness in most people, but with rapidly increased wellbeing. The 'One, Two' approach used in the Counterbalance study was a defined two phase program. The Phase 1 is the period of weight loss - calorie restriction without additional exercise. A carefully planned transition period leads to Phase 2 - long term supported weight maintenance by modest calorie restriction with increased daily physical activity."

This approach has been shown to decrease weight by 33 lbs.

After the details were posted on the Newcastle University, UK website, this has been applied clinically and people who were highly motivated have reported that they have reversed their type 2 diabetes and continued to have normal glucose levels (normoglycaemic) over years.

A further study in general practice, the Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT) funded by Diabetes UK is now underway to determine the applicability of this general approach to routine Primary Care practice with findings due before the end of the year.

For more information click here: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/magres/research/diabetes/reversal/#overview
 

Loudmouth

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Apparently carb counting is not enough. to lose the weight we have to count calories too.
 

Melensdad

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Apparently carb counting is not enough. to lose the weight we have to count calories too.

I always thought that was obvious.

Calories are the main component. Cutting carbs helps a lot, because they turn into sugars in the body. But calories are #1.
 

Loudmouth

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Unfortunately, It wasn't obvious to me. I thought I could eat all the ham and chicken I wanted, as long as my carbs were as close to zero as I could make them. It's still a learning curve for me.
 
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