New toilet installation

jpr62902

Jeanclaude Spam Banhammer
SUPER Site Supporter
So I'm putting in a micro-master suite at the hacienda and in the bathroom, the toilet water supply comes through the floor. At what height do I trim the copper supply line? Keep in mind, I'm soldering the shutoff valve on to the supply line.
 

Jim_S

Spammer Hammer
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
You're working on the master bath at midnight?

I just looked at our master bath and the upstairs hall bath. both come up from the floor and it looks like 3 1/2 to 4 inches stick up out of the floor with the valve sweated to that. I have no idea if code addresses this but it probably does.

Hope this helps.

Jim
 

jpr62902

Jeanclaude Spam Banhammer
SUPER Site Supporter
No, I quit at about 11:00 pm when I got the flange shimmed, glued and screwed.:biggrin:

3 1/2 -- 4 inches?? Really? Are they copper supply lines?
 

Doc

Administrator
Staff member
I'd just go a couple inches. Enough to leave you a little to work with. I do not know about code though.
 

jpr62902

Jeanclaude Spam Banhammer
SUPER Site Supporter
I'd just go a couple inches. Enough to leave you a little to work with. I do not know about code though.

That's kinda what I was thinking -- just enough room to sweat the shutoff to the supply. Maybe JEV can chime in come morning ....

yep, copper at the fixtures.

Jim

That surprises me a bit, Jim, but hey! What do I know?:biggrin: And thanks for checking, btw!:clap:
 

Doc

Administrator
Staff member
I'm relating to the one I just put in, but the copper came through the wall. I did not want it sticking out to far so I cut it between 2 and 3 inches. Once I fit the fitting over it just two inches are now showing.

I was going to sweat the fitting but could not find a fitting other than compression in the type of shutoff valve I wanted. The compression fittings worked well for toilet and sink shut offs.
 

JEV

Mr. Congeniality
GOLD Site Supporter
The supply valve is mounted at the floor, and I don't recommend sweating the stop valve to the copper. Use a compression valve, and then use a flexible 3/8" toilet supply. Be sure to get the toilet supply and not a sink supply. The tag on the flex line will say TOILET.

The reason for this type of installation is for maintenance purposes. If the toilet needs a new fill valve, the flex line is easily removes and reinstalled. Same goes for the supply valve. If something goes wrong with the valve, the old valve is quickly replaces with a new valve by uncoupling it from the compression nut. No sweating involved.

Sweating in lav and toilet supply valves is very old school, and while there is nothing wrong with it (until you have to replace a valve), compression valves go in quickly and are easy to replace. If you sweat the valve, be sure to remove the stem from the valve body so you don't melt the washer or the plastic stem if you're using a valve with a plastic stem. Also, it is cheaper to replace compression components because of the labor saved if you need a plumber later on to do repairs. Either way. remember to place the chrome trim ring over the copper pipe before installing the valve. Don't ask why I emphasize this. :whistling::brows:


 

jpr62902

Jeanclaude Spam Banhammer
SUPER Site Supporter
Yep. Compression fitting was the way to go. Looks like I'll be using those from now on.:biggrin:
 

muleman

worn out farmer
GOLD Site Supporter
Easy to see why you are a lawyer and not a plumber. Never work on plumbing by choice on weekends or holidays or after 4 pm. Too hard to find parts if something screws up.
 

waybomb

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
I'm still trying to figure out what he's using the crow bar for???????????
 

JEV

Mr. Congeniality
GOLD Site Supporter
Pic for reference:
It may be an optical illusion, but is the toilet flange installed so that the toilet bolts are 12" to 12-1/2" from the finished wall? The center of the radius slot should be 12 to 12-1/2" from the wall. Check and correct now, before you try to install the toilet. My guess is that the flange is already glued to the soil pipe. If the flange is improperly located, you can remove the flange screws, cut the soil pipe from the underside so the flange can be rotated, then rejoined using a coupling. You may need to remove 1/4" from the soil pipe if it's in a rigid configuration.
 

jpr62902

Jeanclaude Spam Banhammer
SUPER Site Supporter
I was using the pry bar to chisel out the thinset that oozed under where the flange would be. The flange was centered just under 12" off the wall:
 

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waybomb

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
So we have an attorney that can actually do a nice repair / new construction job all by himself??!!

:clap:

Good job man!

Is it out of necessity since there isn't a contractor within 100 miles of you because you've sued them all.:whistling:
 

jpr62902

Jeanclaude Spam Banhammer
SUPER Site Supporter
I WISH I could claim all that work as my own! I paid some contractors to frame, drywall, tile and rough in the plumbing. I'm doing the electric, painting, trim carpentry and finish plumbing. I just finished yanking the sink out of a vanity, as it was apparently installed by a blind person at the factory.:doh:

Some before pics:
 

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