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Mini Air Compressor

Melensdad

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Just ordered one of these "Stop & Go" mini air compressors for carrying on my motorcycle.

I hope it works. There are a lot of good reviews and some bad reviews too. I actually wanted a different compressor but it is out of stock and a new model is supposed to have been available this month. Of course, the new model is not available and neither is the old model. The only reason I wanted it is because it is slightly smaller than this one, but not by much. So this was my 2nd choice.

I have SAE plugs wired to the batteries on my bikes so I won't need the cigarette lighter adapter or the little clips. The SAE plug on the bikes will eliminate those added bits. Currently I am using CO2 air canisters for emergency inflators but each canister only inflates a motorcycle tire with about 4# of air so if I have a flat it will take 10 of those canisters, which are single use items, to fill the rear tire on my bike and 9 to fill a front tire. I already have tire repair kits on the bikes.

I wanted the DYNAPLUG but got the STOP & GO mini compressor.

I'm not overly concerned about the time it takes to fill a tire. If it takes a few extra minutes to inflate I won't worry. The Dynaplug has some advantages but, as I said, they are not offering it anymore and the new model is not available. The lovely Mrs_Bob and I are getting ready to leave for a trip so actually having a compressor in fact is better than wanting one in theory.

Here is a video review of both of these brands -->




Here is a video review, by an actual user, of the STOP & GO mini compressor -->

 

Melensdad

Jerk in a Hawaiian Shirt & SNOWCAT Moderator
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
The Stop & Go pump arrived today. Unboxed it but did not have a chance to go test it. Got a photo. It is very compact. I'm hoping the pressure gauge is close to accurate. It is very compact, packs in a small case. Comes with 2 extra accessory cords, one with a cigarette lighter plug and one with small alligator clips. Also comes with accessories to fill up a beach ball or a football. All packed in a nice little compact case.

There is an instruction sheet and also an included notecard that clearly states this pump is NOT for car/truck tires. I suspect it would overheat trying to pump enough volume into a car/truck tire to fill it to pressure. It states it is designed for motorcycles, ATVs, etc.

I'm going to test the pump and compare the pressure gauge to a couple other gauges I have, just to make sure it works and the gauges is accurate enough. Also I'll still carry the compressed CO2 canisters that I have for emergency use, I have 10 of those and each is good for about 4# of air, but if this little pump proves to be reliable then it is likely that if I use the C02 canisters I probably won't replace them. The compressed C02 canisters are great for emergencies but are only single use.

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Melensdad

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OK so test is complete.

What I found is that the pump works. It also is not obnoxiously loud.

It has a little flashlight on one side of the pump, the light is OPPOSITE of the side where the hose comes out. So while the light is probably very useful, it cannot be used to illuminate the hose end while you try to connect it to your tire.

I compared the pump's gauge to a simple pencil gauge and also to a dial gauge. Both the dial and the pencil gauges were reading identically throughout the testing, so I don't know if they are accurate but they are consistent and match each other. I would note that both of those gauges match the electronic TPMS. The pump's gauge consistently reported a few pounds higher pressures than the TPMS or either the dial or pencil gauge starting at about 40#.

The gauge seems to be "optimistic" in its read out as the pressures goes up the accuracy seems to trail off. Let some air out, starting with 34# of pressure in the tire on the manual gauges, the pump also was reading 34#. As pressure builds it seems like the pump reads a few pounds higher than the manual gauges.

Ultimately I pumped the tire up to 45# of pressure (per the pump's gauge) which equalled roughly 40# of pressure on the TPMS. Realistically I bled off a bit of air removing the screw on connection. Bled off a bit more as I tested the air pressure on the manual gauges. Bled off a bit more as I reinstalled the TPMS.

For $36, including taxes & shipping, I'm very happy with the purchase.

There are more expensive pumps, maybe they work "better" and there are cheaper pumps, but this one is small, packs small with all its accessories, and it actually works.


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