I think I found the problem. (Electrical)

bczoom

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Had a circuit breaker started tripping so I guessed on where the issue may be. Pretty sure my guess was correct. Not sure if it's just me but this receptacle doesn't look quite right so I replaced it. It's for the sewer pump and is in that damp area.

A more permanent fix (other than just replacing the receptacle) to be applied once all the parts are in.

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bczoom

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Spending 20+ years in a wet environment? (It's actually in the septic tank).

I'm going to replace the float switch which was what was plugged into it. Part arrives Monday. Replacing breaker with GFCI. Thinking about replacing receptacle with a "waterproof" but aren't those just pretty much rainproof? If it sat in a damp environment, wont the dampness seep into the box?
 

road squawker

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Spending 20+ years in a wet environment? (It's actually in the septic tank).

I'm going to replace the float switch which was what was plugged into it. Part arrives Monday. Replacing breaker with GFCI. Thinking about replacing receptacle with a "waterproof" but aren't those just pretty much rainproof? If it sat in a damp environment, wont the dampness seep into the box?

actually,.......... if this one operated properly for 20 years,............ I would replace it with the exact same thing
 

Jim_S

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Use a single outlet instead of a duplex and put it in a waetherproof enclosure.

Less exposure to the moisture

I wouldn't put the gfci in that enviornment put a gfci breaker in the panel or put the gfci outlet in a dry place and feed the septic tank outlet from that.
 

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bczoom

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Use a single outlet instead of a duplex and put it in a waetherproof enclosure.

Less exposure to the moisture

I wouldn't put the gfci in that enviornment put a gfci breaker in the panel or put the gfci outlet in a dry place and feed the septic tank outlet from that.
How well would a weatherproof enclosure work in there? Humidity is probably 90% at all times. I always thought of "weatherproof" as rainproof but won't moisture/humidity get in there anyway?

I'm not going to put the GFCI in there. The lid is too damn heavy (I need the tractor loader to lift it off) to reset and if it does need reset, not sure I want to put my hand in there. GFCI will be in the basement.
 

snowstorm

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Why use a plug/ receptical at all why not hard wire it and add gfci in panel as mentioned ?
 

Kane

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So, tell me again that an electrician installed an electrical duplex outlet in a septic tank. Then tell me someone is going to DIY again.
 

bczoom

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So, tell me again that an electrician installed an electrical duplex outlet in a septic tank. Then tell me someone is going to DIY again.
That setup is common around here.

This is the setup.
iu


This is the float switch with the piggyback plug that the pump plugs into.
8411d1359225691-sump-pump-wont-stop-running-float-switch.jpg
 

Kane

New member
That setup is common around here.

This is the setup.
iu


This is the float switch with the piggyback plug that the pump plugs into.
8411d1359225691-sump-pump-wont-stop-running-float-switch.jpg
If we study Diagram 3, we'll see that the pump is hardwired, with a wire coil long enough to remove the pump from the tank for servicing. There is certainly no "duplex outlet" shown, and we can only presume that a proper ground fault connection at or near the circuit breaker board, inside the domicile.

The float/pigtail device you show is really nice. But it is for other applications (see the float on/off/alarm points in Diagram 3). Whoever did the original pump installation took, shall we say, some liberties. Feel free to do it again and just let your heirs or the next homeowner deal with it some day down the road.
 
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road squawker

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That setup is common around here.

This is the setup.
iu


This is the float switch with the piggyback plug that the pump plugs into.
8411d1359225691-sump-pump-wont-stop-running-float-switch.jpg


I guess the term "Intrinsically safe"has no meaning there.

the elect plug does not have to be inside the tank, it should be run from an external receptacle through the tank wall and then properly sealed. so should the pump power wire too.


BTW, all that brown crud/stain/rust is due to the corrosive (and EXPLOSIVE) METHANE gas in the tank:doh:
 

bczoom

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If we study Diagram 3, we'll see that the pump is hardwired, with a wire coil long enough to remove the pump from the tank for servicing. There is certainly no "duplex outlet" shown, and we can only presume that a proper ground fault connection at or near the circuit breaker board, inside the domicile.
Diagram 3?

I'm all for doing it right if y'all can show me what right looks like, I'll change the current setup.
 
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