Excavator seat time

Doc

Administrator
Staff member
Drove the excavator over the back 40 to the river this morning. 3/4 mile of seat puckering fun. I had the excavator rocking like a rocking chair more than once. Made me appreciate the skill of the operator who has done major trail improvements and fixed a huge slip on my property. He always made it look so easy an natural.
 

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bczoom

Super Moderator
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
What's causing the pucker factor? Looks like nice trails/land from the pics.
 

Doc

Administrator
Staff member
The hill is steeper than the pic looks and rocks and bumps on it make the excavator rock mainly cause I'm new at it. I learned to take it slower and set the bucket to prevent rocking then pick the bucket up slowly. Plus I got stuck going up the hill, one track would not get traction on a rock other track got traction. Could only turn sideways. had to back up and readdress the rock a few times till I made it. Steep ledge beside this area, about 200 ft to the river. Made me pucker.
 

300 H and H

Bronze Member
GOLD Site Supporter
When you walk one of these machines, most will roll in the bucket and raise and pull in the mast to get as close to the machine body as possible.

This will help with the for and aft roll caused by the weight of the attachment from causing the shift in the center of gravity..

You learn by doing. How fast you learn is the question... LOL

Good luck and be very careful, especially if you enter a hole you dug deep. Cave ins are more common than you might think..

Regards, Kirk
 

mla2ofus

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
With lack of traction on the rock, run the stick out just past plumb, with the bucket rolled in set it on the ground with a little down pressure. Pull the stick in while applying travel to the tracks.
Mike
 

Doc

Administrator
Staff member
When you walk one of these machines, most will roll in the bucket and raise and pull in the mast to get as close to the machine body as possible.

This will help with the for and aft roll caused by the weight of the attachment from causing the shift in the center of gravity..

You learn by doing. How fast you learn is the question... LOL

Good luck and be very careful, especially if you enter a hole you dug deep. Cave ins are more common than you might think..

Regards, Kirk

Thanks Kirk. Yes, to true ...how fast will I learn. I am getting better at controlling the roll. I dug out a big ole stump on a hill today and did okay till I tried to carry the stump to another location up and down some hills. LOL way to tipsy with a 800 pound stump. Will get it with the FEL with forks on.

No plans to dig a real deep hole that I'd have to drive in. Can't imagine doing that at this point. Maybe after a few hundred more hours on the machine. Thanks again. Good info.

With lack of traction on the rock, run the stick out just past plumb, with the bucket rolled in set it on the ground with a little down pressure. Pull the stick in while applying travel to the tracks.
Mike

Thanks Mike. Interesting. I'll have to try that. I love to read these tips as it would take me a lot longer to finally figure something like that out on my own. Love operating the machine and taking it slow but the more I know the safer I will be at it. :tiphat:
 

Jim_S

Spammer Hammer
GOLD Site Supporter
With lack of traction on the rock, run the stick out just past plumb, with the bucket rolled in set it on the ground with a little down pressure. Pull the stick in while applying travel to the tracks.
Mike

Thanks Mike. Interesting. I'll have to try that. I love to read these tips as it would take me a lot longer to finally figure something like that out on my own. Love operating the machine and taking it slow but the more I know the safer I will be at it. :tiphat:

Doc, if you watch Gold Rush you’ll see a lot of examples of Mike’s suggestion. You’ll also see a examples of what not to do! :bolt:

:th_lmao:
 

JAG

Member
Interesting thread.
I have run a backhoe years ago. It was a Caterpillar. I was digging sand out of a sandpit
and loading it into dump trucks to be carried to construction sites. Lotta fun.
 

mla2ofus

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
Did you pull the stick in as close as possible with the stump in the thumb. If that didn't work hook a chain around the stump and hook it to the dozer, swing around and travel backward. Just remember your travel controls will be backassward!!
Mike
 

Doc

Administrator
Staff member
Did you pull the stick in as close as possible with the stump in the thumb. If that didn't work hook a chain around the stump and hook it to the dozer, swing around and travel backward. Just remember your travel controls will be backassward!!
Mike
Yes, I did pull it as close as possible. Root ball's base was 5' or so and that kept me out some. Did not consider going backwards. I have done that and find it very handy. With the blade on the back it would have helped counterbalance. These hills that I've gotten used to in the tractor seem much steeper with that stick out in front of me. I always thought with tracks you could go anywhere with ease like a tank. You might be able to go anywhere but it takes more work than I envisioned.
 

mla2ofus

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
For cold weather work never travel a frozen sidehill with the tracks parallel to it. It's possible to take a butt puckering sideways ride. If loading the hoe on a wet or frozen trailer deck always make it crossways level for the same reason. All this applies to steel tracks. I have no experience with rubber tracks.
Mike
 
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