carrot seed and TP

mla2ofus

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
Trying something different for planting carrot seed. Glued 4 seed to each square of TP with a water and flour paste. Dried them and folded them up into a coffee can in the fridge. Screened out some dirt with my 1/4" sieve to cover them with. You can just make out the seeds encased in the glue. Lay out the TP and sprinkle a little dirt on it to hold it down. As I progressed I sprinkle more dirt on and spread it out in a 1/4" thick layer. I planted 576 seeds in a 4' square area. When finished I watered it down good. I hope this works well so I don't have to thin carrot seedlings anymore. If this works good I may do it for beet seed also. I did all this gluing while there was snow on the ground so I'm sure I'd have time to do both.
Mike
 

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EastTexFrank

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
You do know that the TP is more valuable and more difficult to get than the carrots will ever be. :bolt:

I've never heard of it being done like that. Let us know how it goes. I'm interested.
 

Jim_S

Spammer Hammer
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
You do know that the TP is more valuable and more difficult to get than the carrots will ever be. :bolt:

I've never heard of it being done like that. Let us know how it goes. I'm interested.

Theres a chance he will get both carrots and tp! :th_lmao:
 

bczoom

Super Moderator
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
I've done similar for starting veggie plants indoors before the growing season starts. Using a flat surface (like a cookie sheet), put a layer of paper towels in the bottom. Lay your seeds then another layer of paper towels on top. Water lightly (don't drown them).

"I planted 576 seeds in a 4' square area." - I hope you plan on freezing or something. If you eat them fresh, that's a lot of carrots to eat when they all come in at the same time.
 

Bamby

New member
"I planted 576 seeds in a 4' square area." - I hope you plan on freezing or something. If you eat them fresh, that's a lot of carrots to eat when they all come in at the same time.

Back when I grew them I found they did best leaving them in the ground. Years they would actually keep growing in the winter some and when some were pulled for the table they were as fresh as well like they'd just came out of the garden.
 

FrancSevin

Proudly Deplorable
GOLD Site Supporter
Trying something different for planting carrot seed. Glued 4 seed to each square of TP with a water and flour paste. Dried them and folded them up into a coffee can in the fridge. Screened out some dirt with my 1/4" sieve to cover them with. You can just make out the seeds encased in the glue. Lay out the TP and sprinkle a little dirt on it to hold it down. As I progressed I sprinkle more dirt on and spread it out in a 1/4" thick layer. I planted 576 seeds in a 4' square area. When finished I watered it down good. I hope this works well so I don't have to thin carrot seedlings anymore. If this works good I may do it for beet seed also. I did all this gluing while there was snow on the ground so I'm sure I'd have time to do both.
Mike

That is a capital idea.

Here's my contribution.

Save TP roll cores (assuming you can still get them) and use them for planting pots. I bundle them in sixes with rubber bands and fill with potting soil. Use saved fast food packaging as trays to retain water and soil. Water only from the trays.

You can plant these directly into the garden as the cardboard tube will degrade.
 

FrancSevin

Proudly Deplorable
GOLD Site Supporter
Back when I grew them I found they did best leaving them in the ground. Years they would actually keep growing in the winter some and when some were pulled for the table they were as fresh as well like they'd just came out of the garden.


True that. And fresh carrot tops are a great addition to salads. Something one cannot usually do with store bought ones as they have wilted. Unappetizing and bitter.

Cut them off fresh, they are delicious, and the plant will regrow fresh new ones.
 

mla2ofus

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
I've done similar for starting veggie plants indoors before the growing season starts. Using a flat surface (like a cookie sheet), put a layer of paper towels in the bottom. Lay your seeds then another layer of paper towels on top. Water lightly (don't drown them).

"I planted 576 seeds in a 4' square area." - I hope you plan on freezing or something. If you eat them fresh, that's a lot of carrots to eat when they all come in at the same time.

We peel them,slice,blanch, and vacuum pac to freeze. Before vac pac I divide them equally between 2 old pillow cases put them in the washer to spin and presto, no water to deal with sealing the bags.
Mike
 

mla2ofus

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
Back when I grew them I found they did best leaving them in the ground. Years they would actually keep growing in the winter some and when some were pulled for the table they were as fresh as well like they'd just came out of the garden.

Never tried it But I bet in our area by Jan. you'd have to drill and shoot as our frost goes quite deep.
Mike
 

mla2ofus

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
That is a capital idea.

Here's my contribution.

Save TP roll cores (assuming you can still get them) and use them for planting pots. I bundle them in sixes with rubber bands and fill with potting soil. Use saved fast food packaging as trays to retain water and soil. Water only from the trays.

You can plant these directly into the garden as the cardboard tube will degrade.

That sounds like a good idea, Franc.
Mike
 
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