A wood working challenge.

Bannedjoe

Active member
These are a set of doors my mother gave me many years ago that I'll be incorporating into my house addition.
The thing is, I only have two, and need at least 3, maybe more to keep with the theme.
There'll be lots of bevel cuts and dados for sure, with mortise and tenons all over the place combined with tongue and groove.

My question for this morning, is what do you call the piece, or to be more precise, the process in making the piece in the second picture?
I'm guessing it could be made with a series of dado cuts before being inserted.
These pieces are all floating in the door, mounted in with T&G joints.

Thanks!
 

Melensdad

Jerk in a Hawaiian Shirt
Staff member
GOLD Site Supporter
Use a router with an appropriate router bit.

Probably easiest if you table mount the route (a router mounted upside down in a table with the bit coming up through a hole and adjustable guide boards) and just run the wood through similar to the way you'd run it through a table saw.
 

Bannedjoe

Active member
Use a router with an appropriate router bit.

Probably easiest if you table mount the route (a router mounted upside down in a table with the bit coming up through a hole and adjustable guide boards) and just run the wood through similar to the way you'd run it through a table saw.

Thanks.
I haven't pulled the trigger on a router and table yet.

I'm certain there's a proper name for the piece in question, and a proper name for the cut/style/process.
That's what I'm really looking for.
 

pixie

Active member
SUPER Site Supporter
It's called a raised panel. The router bit to make it will have wings sticking out each side and be dangerous to use. Do not go for the full cut all at once ! It's also possible to make a panel on a table saw.

There are places online where you can buy just the panel with various profiles.
 

jimbo

Bronze Member
GOLD Site Supporter
It's called a raised panel. The router bit to make it will have wings sticking out each side and be dangerous to use. Do not go for the full cut all at once ! It's also possible to make a panel on a table saw.

There are places online where you can buy just the panel with various profiles.


I'd make that panel on a table saw unless it's something other than straight cuts. Keep in mind that a router is designed for hand held use and is a pain to use upside down underneath a table. If you do buy a router, buy a large one and a substantial heavy table. That's a $600 plus tool. Pixie's correct. A router is a dangerous tool. Use push sticks and hold downs.

Unless you plan to use it a lot, I'd take it to the local cabinet shop. They've got the tools already set up and will make it in 4 passes. 15 minutes. You will spend half a day.
 

jpr62902

Jeanclaude Spam Banhammer
SUPER Site Supporter
What Bob said. Router table and a raised panel bit set that has matching cope and stick bits for the stiles and rails. Easy peasy.
 

EastTexFrank

Well-known member
GOLD Site Supporter
What Bob said. Router table and a raised panel bit set that has matching cope and stick bits for the stiles and rails. Easy peasy.

What jpr said. I'd use my router table rather than a router and a table. Looking at it, it will be time consuming and finicky and will take some preplanning but not really that difficult. I should say that at one time in my life it wouldn't have been too difficult. These days with my diminished skill set, I don't know if I can sharpen a pencil anymore, I don't think that I'd even attempt it. :smileywac

If you do get a router table be very careful. Like a table saw (Bob) and a band saw (Me), they don't take any prisoners, use push sticks, feather boards and hold downs.
 

Bannedjoe

Active member
Thanks for all the input gang.
I'll post some more pics of these doors soon.
There's a lot going on with them, and I suspect I will do just about everything on the table saw, except for cutting the mortises. (or should that be Morti?) ;)

Raised panel is the term I was looking for.

The build will be fun and challenging, and I don't care about the time, I want to make these myself.
One of the biggest challenges (I think) will be artificially aging and stressing the wood to match that of the original doors.
 
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