Forums Forums - Off Topic Forum FUN




Go Back   Forums Forums - Off Topic Forum FUN > Off Topic Forums > Open Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-10-2010, 11:27 PM
loboloco's Avatar
loboloco loboloco is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: SC
Posts: 5,574
Thanks: 90
Thanked 228 Times in 105 Posts
loboloco will become famous soon enough
Default antique shoe

Oldest leather shoe steps out after 5,500 years


AP – This undated handout photo provided by the Department of Archaeology University College Cork, Cork Ireland, …




By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID, AP Science Writer Randolph E. Schmid, Ap Science Writer – Wed Jun 9, 7:11 pm ET
WASHINGTON – About 5,500 years ago someone in the mountains of Armenia put his best foot forward in what is now the oldest leather shoe ever found.
It'll never be confused with a penny loafer or a track shoe, but the well-preserved footwear was made of a single piece of leather, laced up the front and back, researchers reported Wednesday in PLoS One, a journal of the Public Library of Science.
Worn and shaped by the wearer's right foot, the shoe was found in a cave along with other evidence of human occupation. The shoe had been stuffed with grass, which dated to the same time as the leather of the shoe €” between 5,637 and 5,387 years ago.
"This is great luck," enthused archaeologist Ron Pinhasi of University College Cork in Cork, Ireland, who led the research team.
"We normally only find broken pots, but we have very little information about the day-to-day activity" of these ancient people. "What did they eat? What did they do? What did they wear? This is a chance to see this ... it gives us a real glimpse into society," he said in a telephone interview.
Previously the oldest leather shoe discovered in Europe or Asia was on the famous Otzi, the "Iceman" found frozen in the Alps a few years ago and now preserved in Italy. Otzi has been dated to 5,375 and 5,128 years ago, a few hundred years more recent than the Armenian shoe.
Otzi's shoes were made of deer and bear leather held together by a leather strap. The Armenian shoe appears to be made of cowhide, Pinhasi said.
Older sandals have been found in a cave in Missouri, but those were made of fiber rather than leather.
The shoe found in what is now Armenia was found in a pit, along with a broken pot and some wild goat horns.
But Pinhasi doesn't think it was thrown away. There was discarded material that had been tossed outside the cave, while this pit was inside in the living area. And while the shoe had been worn, it wasn't worn out.
It's not clear if the grass that filled the shoe was intended as a lining or insulation, or to maintain the shape of the shoe when it was stored, according to the researchers.

The Armenian shoe was small by current standards — European size 37 or U.S. women's size 7 — but might have fit a man of that era, according to Pinhasi.
He described the shoe as a single piece of leather cut to fit the foot. The back of the shoe was closed by a lace passing through four sets of eyelets. In the front, 15 pairs of eyelets were used to lace from toe to top.
There was no reinforcement in the sole, just the one layer of leather. "I don't know how long it would last in rocky terrain," Pinhasi said.
He noted that the shoe is similar to a type of footwear common in the Aran Islands, west of Ireland, up until the 1950s. The Irish version, known as "pampooties" reportedly didn't last long, he said.
"In fact, enormous similarities exist between the manufacturing technique and style of this (Armenian) shoe and those found across Europe at later periods, suggesting that this type of shoe was worn for thousands of years across a large and environmentally diverse region," Pinhasi said.
While the Armenian shoe was soft when unearthed, the leather has begun to harden now that it is exposed to air, Pinhasi said.
Oh, and unlike a lot of very old shoes, it didn't smell.
Pinhasi said the shoe is currently at the Institute of Archaeology in Yerevan, but he hopes it will be sent to laboratories in either Switzerland or Germany where it can be treated for preservation and then returned to Armenia for display in a museum.
Pinhasi, meanwhile, is heading back to Armenia this week, hoping the other shoe will drop.
The research was funded by the National Geographic Society, the Chitjian Foundation, the Gfoeller Foundation, the Steinmetz Family Foundation, the Boochever Foundation and the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-11-2010, 01:09 AM
BigAl's Avatar
BigAl BigAl is offline
Super Moderator

 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 11,032
Thanks: 144
Thanked 203 Times in 136 Posts
BigAl will become famous soon enough
Default Re: antique shoe

Man those look comfortable ... I bet he was pissed when that one came up missing . I know I love my "broken in" old shoes . They make my feet happy
__________________
Big Al
2B1ASK1
See my Kristi Video here : Kristi KT3 - YouTube


Disclaimer: Read with caution !!
Poster may be Bad Speller at times .
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Remember the 'shoe' incident in Iraq? Doc Political Debate Forum 15 02-02-2009 05:11 PM
Anybody here really know alot about antique furniture and clocks? waybomb Open Forum 10 12-17-2008 09:36 AM
Gigantic Shoe Sale Today! Deadly Sushi Junkman's Corner 9 03-29-2008 07:58 AM
Restoring antique furniture NorthernRedneck Home Improvement Projects, Appliance upgrades, Misc Household items Forum 0 05-14-2007 12:36 AM
Judge Young & the shoe bomber thcri Political Debate Forum 4 02-21-2006 05:47 PM





All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2002 - 2018 www.ForumsForums.com