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Old 05-03-2017, 08:54 PM
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Default Boating Do's and Don'ts

From: http://vikkifraser.com/how-not-to-be...-friends-boat/


How Not To Be “That Guy” When Invited On a Friend’s Boat
Vikki Fraser

Hey! You’ve been invited to go boating with your friends! Folks with boats know people will start coming out of the woodwork the moment they buy a boat and are usually more than happy to have some others along. But there are a few rules you need to follow in order to get invited back. Keep in mind, boats aren’t cheap to buy or maintain. Also marine gas ain’t cheap either and someone will be cleaning up a house full of tracked in lake mud after your adventure. They’re spending time and money to take you out so don’t act like some D-bag at a frat party.

Here’s a couple of rules to ensure you’ll receive future invites. (Note: When I say guy, I mean guys and girls, I’m from Michigan it’s what we do.)

1) Food – Don’t be the guy that brings one bag of pretzel rods for a full day of boating. Eventually you will get hungry (especially after a few beverages) and when you do you will have to depend on the kindness of others to be fed properly. Mainly because they don’t want your drunk ass passing out due to lack of proper nutrition or falling off the boat. Consider bringing a sub sandwich, chopped fruit, veggies, chips or some other easy to transport food. Be gracious when someone does offer you their food and don’t just take for granted that the host/hostess is supposed to feed you unless this was specifically implied.

2) Drinks – Always bring twice what you can drink. Boating is a communal affair and you may have to share a couple beers. (Because there’s always the person who came completely empty handed or underestimated their ability to consume beverages on a hot day). Also don’t show up with just drinks, put them in a cooler and cover them with ice. Unless you’re bringing Fireball, we’ll make room in our cooler for that. And drink a water every now and again. Proper hydration will ensure that you don’t get too intoxicated and be “That Guy.”

3) Guests – Did you tell the captain you were bringing a friend/dog/child on their boat? Bringing tag-alongs without notice is a big no-no. Maybe that extra will overcrowd the boat, or pee on the carpet (I mean the dog not the friend) and some situations just aren’t kid friendly. Besides, now you are personally responsible for the care and feeding of your guest. You’re going to have to share your warm 6 pack and pretzel rods between 2 people now. Always check with your host/hostess before dragging along a sidekick. Yes, even you, beloved friend.

4) Smoking – Always ask before lighting up on someone’s boat. Once again these are expensive machines, and just because they’re open air doesn’t mean it’s ok. Owners always fear that some drunk may put a burn hole in the seat. Be considerate and ask first and NEVER throw your butts in the water.

5) Littering – Speaking of throwing things in the water. Absolutely nothing goes into the water that is not seaweed. Orange rinds, peanut shells, and such are no big deal but be mindful of your beer caps, cigarette butts, wrappers and cans. Litter is destructive and disgusting. In fact if you find a piece of trash in the water, pick it up and put it in a trash bin. Don’t be a piggy.

6) Be Prepared – Be sure you’ve brought all you need for fun in the sun. This includes sunscreen, sunglasses, chapstick, and a towel along with your food and drinks. Trust your friends when they say you need sunscreen or a water.

7) The Captain – OK here’s the deal: The captain is in charge of the boat. (The captain may not always be the one in the drivers seat) If he/she says it’s time to go, it’s time to go. If they ask you to move, sit down or shut up, do it. As fun and relaxing as boating is, it is the captains job to ensure the safety of all the people on their boat and they are liable for you. Also, the captain chooses the music or appoints a DJ, end of story.

8) Safety – If you feel a “Hold my beer and watch this” moment coming up, just say no. Do not push anyone out of a moving boat or jump out of a moving boat. Do not hang out by the motor of a running boat. Don’t try a double back flip off the platform. Don’t sit on the rails at high speeds. In other words don’t be dumb.

9) Passenger Etiquette – Respect the boat! Don’t step on seats, only hard surfaces if possible. Leave coolers on the floor. Don’t bring any glass on board. Respect equipment including paddle boards and floats. Don’t play with any buttons or switches. Don’t try to start the boat while the captain is away. Don’t try to “help” unless the captain asks you to. A friend also mentioned that you should use spray sunscreen BEFORE getting on the boat. Sunscreen spray makes seats sticky and hard to clean. The lotion kind is better for your skin and the environment anyway.

10) Don’t be late – Nothing is more tiresome than sitting with a boat full of people waiting on that one person who didn’t plan ahead. We could be out having fun, but no we’re still at the dock because you just texted “On My Way!” from inside the beer store. Have some respect for your friends and get there when you are supposed to.

11) Disembarking – Don’t stand up until the boat is fully secure. Make sure you grab everything you brought with you on the boat. Make sure all trash has been cleared and put it in a proper place at the house. Ask for help if you need it. And ask the Captain if they need help wiping down the boat!

Oh and if you get invited out regularly, offer to chip in for gas. A gas station gift card is the easy way to make this happen. That’s it for now friends! Please let me know if you think of something else I can add!

——————————————————————————————————————–
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Old 05-03-2017, 08:59 PM
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Default Re: Boating Do's and Don'ts

The suggested do's and don'ts above are right on for the most part. But the last comment about buying gas or a meal can be a problem.

I read in comments to this article that if you pay for gas or a meal for the captain of that turns him into a charter and IF something happens and a lawsuit is the result. The captain could be in real hot water. Is this still true? I do not know, but thought it worth mentioning.
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Old 05-03-2017, 10:03 PM
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Default Re: Boating Do's and Don'ts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc View Post
The suggested do's and don'ts above are right on for the most part. But the last comment about buying gas or a meal can be a problem.

I read in comments to this article that if you pay for gas or a meal for the captain of that turns him into a charter and IF something happens and a lawsuit is the result. The captain could be in real hot water. Is this still true? I do not know, but thought it worth mentioning.
I don't agree that paying for gas turns the ride into a charter. Ditto beer or meal.

Owner is paying for the boat, slip, insurance, maintenance, upkeep. I'll buy gas, beer and dinner.
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Old 05-03-2017, 10:29 PM
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Default Re: Boating Do's and Don'ts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc View Post
The suggested do's and don'ts above are right on for the most part. But the last comment about buying gas or a meal can be a problem.

I read in comments to this article that if you pay for gas or a meal for the captain of that turns him into a charter and IF something happens and a lawsuit is the result. The captain could be in real hot water. Is this still true? I do not know, but thought it worth mentioning.
The situation is no different than bringing a dish to a pot luck dinner party. The host does not need to be a licensed restaurateur. If you didn't buy a ticket or sign liability waivers, then you didn't hire the captain or the boat. A gift of thanks for the pleasure of the day on his/her boat is appropriate and legal.

However, what you suggest is possible under certain conditions. If the owner requires something in order for you to enjoy his boat, then both of you are subject to the law. Him, for operating a livery without certifications and you for paying a scab captain.
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Old 05-03-2017, 11:01 PM
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Default Re: Boating Do's and Don'ts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc View Post
From: http://vikkifraser.com/how-not-to-be...-friends-boat/


How Not To Be “That Guy” When Invited On a Friend’s Boat
Vikki Fraser

Hey! You’ve been invited to go boating with your friends! Folks with boats know people will start coming out of the woodwork the moment they buy a boat and are usually more than happy to have some others along. But there are a few rules you need to follow in order to get invited back. Keep in mind, boats aren’t cheap to buy or maintain. Also marine gas ain’t cheap either and someone will be cleaning up a house full of tracked in lake mud after your adventure. They’re spending time and money to take you out so don’t act like some D-bag at a frat party.

Here’s a couple of rules to ensure you’ll receive future invites. (Note: When I say guy, I mean guys and girls, I’m from Michigan it’s what we do.)

1) Food – Don’t be the guy that brings one bag of pretzel rods for a full day of boating. Eventually you will get hungry (especially after a few beverages) and when you do you will have to depend on the kindness of others to be fed properly. Mainly because they don’t want your drunk ass passing out due to lack of proper nutrition or falling off the boat. Consider bringing a sub sandwich, chopped fruit, veggies, chips or some other easy to transport food. Be gracious when someone does offer you their food and don’t just take for granted that the host/hostess is supposed to feed you unless this was specifically implied.

2) Drinks – Always bring twice what you can drink. Boating is a communal affair and you may have to share a couple beers. (Because there’s always the person who came completely empty handed or underestimated their ability to consume beverages on a hot day). Also don’t show up with just drinks, put them in a cooler and cover them with ice. Unless you’re bringing Fireball, we’ll make room in our cooler for that. And drink a water every now and again. Proper hydration will ensure that you don’t get too intoxicated and be “That Guy.”

3) Guests – Did you tell the captain you were bringing a friend/dog/child on their boat? Bringing tag-alongs without notice is a big no-no. Maybe that extra will overcrowd the boat, or pee on the carpet (I mean the dog not the friend) and some situations just aren’t kid friendly. Besides, now you are personally responsible for the care and feeding of your guest. You’re going to have to share your warm 6 pack and pretzel rods between 2 people now. Always check with your host/hostess before dragging along a sidekick. Yes, even you, beloved friend.

4) Smoking – Always ask before lighting up on someone’s boat. Once again these are expensive machines, and just because they’re open air doesn’t mean it’s ok. Owners always fear that some drunk may put a burn hole in the seat. Be considerate and ask first and NEVER throw your butts in the water.

5) Littering – Speaking of throwing things in the water. Absolutely nothing goes into the water that is not seaweed. Orange rinds, peanut shells, and such are no big deal but be mindful of your beer caps, cigarette butts, wrappers and cans. Litter is destructive and disgusting. In fact if you find a piece of trash in the water, pick it up and put it in a trash bin. Don’t be a piggy.

6) Be Prepared – Be sure you’ve brought all you need for fun in the sun. This includes sunscreen, sunglasses, chapstick, and a towel along with your food and drinks. Trust your friends when they say you need sunscreen or a water.

7) The Captain – OK here’s the deal: The captain is in charge of the boat. (The captain may not always be the one in the drivers seat) If he/she says it’s time to go, it’s time to go. If they ask you to move, sit down or shut up, do it. As fun and relaxing as boating is, it is the captains job to ensure the safety of all the people on their boat and they are liable for you. Also, the captain chooses the music or appoints a DJ, end of story.

8) Safety – If you feel a “Hold my beer and watch this” moment coming up, just say no. Do not push anyone out of a moving boat or jump out of a moving boat. Do not hang out by the motor of a running boat. Don’t try a double back flip off the platform. Don’t sit on the rails at high speeds. In other words don’t be dumb.

9) Passenger Etiquette – Respect the boat! Don’t step on seats, only hard surfaces if possible. Leave coolers on the floor. Don’t bring any glass on board. Respect equipment including paddle boards and floats. Don’t play with any buttons or switches. Don’t try to start the boat while the captain is away. Don’t try to “help” unless the captain asks you to. A friend also mentioned that you should use spray sunscreen BEFORE getting on the boat. Sunscreen spray makes seats sticky and hard to clean. The lotion kind is better for your skin and the environment anyway.

10) Don’t be late – Nothing is more tiresome than sitting with a boat full of people waiting on that one person who didn’t plan ahead. We could be out having fun, but no we’re still at the dock because you just texted “On My Way!” from inside the beer store. Have some respect for your friends and get there when you are supposed to.

11) Disembarking – Don’t stand up until the boat is fully secure. Make sure you grab everything you brought with you on the boat. Make sure all trash has been cleared and put it in a proper place at the house. Ask for help if you need it. And ask the Captain if they need help wiping down the boat!

Oh and if you get invited out regularly, offer to chip in for gas. A gas station gift card is the easy way to make this happen. That’s it for now friends! Please let me know if you think of something else I can add!

——————————————————————————————————————–
A good comprehensive list.
Especially 7,8,& 9!

As a boat owner for over 50 years, I cannot over stress, the importance of respecting the captain's requests. Boating usually takes place in an environment that can easily KILL YOU. Even at the dock. Do without hesitation, what is asked of you.

It is the responsibility of the Captain, a legal vestment, to provide his guests with a safe passage. A responsible boat owner knows this and is aware. Trust what he says without question. Even if he is an @sshole about it.
Even if you yourself are an accomplished seaman. It is HIS boat. He will lose, if he, or his guest, does not operate it safely and legally on the water.
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Old 05-03-2017, 11:03 PM
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Default Re: Boating Do's and Don'ts

I agree guys ....
Here is some of what I saw ...I have not followed the link provided yet.

The last line of the last quote makes the most common sense to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by comments from link in OP

Wayne
September 6, 2015 at 8:46 pm
It is a Coast Guard regulation.
It states that, if you ask a guest to bring a beverage, or food item, or pay for gas to go out on your boat, the trip for that day is considered a Charter.
It is the stipulation that they bring or pay for something in exchange or privilege of going out on your private vessel.
Then, if you are not a licensed Captain, the Coast Guard can levy a fine.
Follow the link below for more information.
Citation:
http://www.boatsafe.com/nauticalknowhow/passengers.htm

=====================

Bill
July 15, 2016 at 4:22 am
That is Federal Law. All 50 States. Take a Safe Boating Course from the US Coast Guard AUXILIARY. Learn the law. ANY remuneration. Buying dinner, booze, gas, anything of value makes it a charter. Usually not a problem until the guest gets hurt and hires a lawyer. Then, kiss your boat and a bunch of money goodbye.

=====================

Brian
July 17, 2016 at 12:34 pm
As a USCG 100 Ton Master’s License holder and 30+ year boater, I can say that this law is 100% accurate. I find it amusing that those who either don’t care about or know the law, comment about this stuff.
Enjoy your time out on the water this summer folks, I’ll be happy to do it year round! Stay safe out there, and please, all non boating guests… Just listen tho the Captain/boat owner, everyone will be much happier at the end of the day.

========================

Bill
July 15, 2016 at 4:27 am
Maritime law is different. I cannot believe so many Boater’s posting here do not know Federal boating laws. Voluntary or not, receiving remuneration of ANY kind makes any vessel a charter. Period.

======================

Capt. Fish On
April 15, 2016 at 2:28 pm
1) It’s the truth! LEGALY and technically, ANYONE offering or providing a boat owner with ANYTHING ($, food, beer, gas, etc…) is now considered a PAYING PASSENGER on that vessel. That being said, the operator of that vessel (no matter how big or small the boat is) MUST THEN BE A LICENSED CAPTAIN! PERIOD!!!!

====================================

Will J
July 18, 2016 at 2:20 pm
Accepting renumeration for expenses no longer seems to be an issue… Text copied from a thread on the Hull Truth:

Here’s the specifics and has to do with “consideration” and the last sentence is key:

SEC. 506. PASSENGER FOR HIRE.

Section 2101 of title 46, United States Code, is amended by inserting between paragraphs (21) and (22) a new paragraph (21a) to read as follows:

“(21a) ‘passenger for hire’ means a passenger for whom consideration is contributed as a condition of carriage on the vessel, whether directly or indirectly flowing to the owner, charterer, operator, agent, or any other person having an interest in the vessel.”.

DESCRIPTION – The determination of what constitutes the carriage of a “passenger for hire” must be made on a case by case basis. This determination is dependent upon the actual operation of a vessel and the flow of consideration as determined by the facts of each case. In general, there needs to be some form of tangible consideration or promise of performance being passed for a “passenger for hire” situation to exist.

SEC. 507. CONSIDERATION.

Section 2101 of title 46, United States Code, is amended by inserting between paragraphs (5) and (6) a new paragraph (5a) to read as follows:

“(5a) ‘consideration’ means an economic benefit, inducement, right, or profit including pecuniary payment accruing to an individual, person, or entity, but not including a voluntary sharing of the actual expenses of the voyage, by monetary contribution or donation of fuel, food, beverage, or other supplies.”. Additionally, employees or business clients that have not contributed for their carriage, and are carried for morale or entertainment purposes is not included as exchange of consideration.

Bottom line: if you are a recreational boater you are allowed to share expenses for a day on the water. Just don’t make payment mandatory if someone wants a boat ride.
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