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beds
09-25-2006, 04:30 PM
I just saw someone else post this referring to a printer problem, and I've been told this countless times by support people. But what does this rest period actually do? I guess the "network" needs to realize that you are no longer a part of it and reset itself, but how long should that take? Funny that in the nanosecond world of the computer that you need to keep something powered off for an amount of time to reset it.

DaveNay
09-25-2006, 04:34 PM
Some circuits have inductors and capacitors in them (especially the power supplies). Waiting a few seconds allows the charges in these devices to dissipate completely.

Melensdad
09-25-2006, 04:39 PM
Or, you could do what I did. Turn it off and buy and go out and buy an Apple Macintosh :a1:

beds
09-25-2006, 04:43 PM
Some circuits have inductors and capacitors in them (especially the power supplies). Waiting a few seconds allows the charges in these devices to dissipate completely.Somehow I knew Dave would have the actual answer.:thumb:

Melensdad
09-25-2006, 04:46 PM
Somehow I knew Dave would have the actual answer.:thumb:Somewhow I knew that my answer, which is also reasonable, would be trivialized and marginalized by the great many who darken the halls of the computer realm by supporting the evil empire :hide: :yankchain: :yum:

beds
09-25-2006, 05:14 PM
Somewhow I knew that my answer, which is also reasonable, would be trivialized and marginalized by the great many who darken the halls of the computer realm by supporting the evil empire :hide: :yankchain: :yum:Bob, I have often said that Windows is and always has been a poor imitation of the Mac OS.

DaveNay
09-25-2006, 05:28 PM
Bob, I have often said that Windows is and always has been a poor imitation of the Mac OS.

And Mac OS is a quality imitation of a UNIX os.

Crap...I thought that was going to go somewhere profound. :pat:

Doc
09-25-2006, 09:15 PM
Somewhow I knew that my answer, which is also reasonable, would be trivialized and marginalized by the great many who darken the halls of the computer realm by supporting the evil empire :hide: :yankchain: :yum:

Bob, I've never thought of Apple corp as being evil .... it's just for 'special' people. :yankchain: :yankchain: :D

bczoom
09-25-2006, 09:34 PM
Bob, I've never thought of Apple corp as being evil .... it's just for 'special' people. :yankchain: :yankchain: :D
Forrest Gump comes to mind (I watched it again last night).

thcri
09-25-2006, 10:26 PM
Or, you could do what I did. Turn it off and buy and go out and buy an Apple Macintosh :a1:



Seems to me I was about to do that and someone told me not to. That in myh applications it would be a poor decision?? :respect: I just can't remember who that someone was????:pat:

murph

Melensdad
09-25-2006, 10:27 PM
Murph, I'll admit I told you not to buy a MAC, but at least that makes me an honest Mac user. There are some SPECIFIC times when a Mac is not the best choice. Yours was one of those times.

jwstewar
09-26-2006, 08:19 AM
Or, you could do what I did. Turn it off and buy and go out and buy an Apple Macintosh :a1:

So that you can fight with Apple Support and they won't talk to you past the 90 days unless you pay $49 even though it is a hardware problem and it is still under warranty. And then after 3 hours on the phone with them, "I can't help you, it is a hardware problem." :horsepoop: Only to take it to the Apple Store, "Well if you pay $99 we'll move you to the front of the line, otherwise it will be 2 - 4 weeks." WTF???? Finally after 5 times of going through this process, they decided it was best to replace the machine but only after we had to buy the $169 extended warranty. So now the guy is out $320 + all of my consulting charges because Apple wouldn't talk to him about their problem and couldn't figure out how to fix their machine. Let alone their repair "costs" were $1200 each time it was in for service.

Yeah, that is quality customer service. At least if it were a Dell or something else, we could've gotten some off the shelf hardware and had it fixed the first time for a lot less money - or even just bought a new machine and been money ahead.:my2cents:

Melensdad
09-26-2006, 09:14 AM
I'm sure every brand has its horror stories. I buy the apple care protection program to cover the system for 3 years. I used to buy the added coverage for our Dells but now have 3 guys on staff to fix those because the Dell support was so horrible we ended up fixing them ourselves so many times that we essentially needed extra computers on hand to compensate for when a critical one went down and the wait time was 45 minutes to talk to a guy in India who barely can speak understandable English and often had no clue what was wrong with our systems.

The Apple care program costs a couple hundred bucks, I factor it into the cost of the purchase of all my machines, their service is typically very good, "hold time" on the phone ranges from 2 mintues to 15 minutes, but when I am off "hold" I get someone who, 9 times out of 10, can actually help. One out of 10 times I get bumped up to a senior specialist or a product specialist. Most of those times are somehow related to something I screwed up all by myself.

I guess its like tractors. Do you pay a few dollar to get a dealer who will actually provide service, stock parts, pick your machine up/deliver it to you, send you a magazine from the company 6 times a year, or do you buy your tractor from 3 states away to save a few bucks and then deal with the hassels?

I've never argued that Apple is cheaper. But I do believe that in the long run, Apple is cheaper to own, requires fewer updates, has fewer crashes, fewer conflicts, and far less grief.

thcri
09-26-2006, 09:19 AM
Murph, I'll admit I told you not to buy a MAC, but at least that makes me an honest Mac user. There are some SPECIFIC times when a Mac is not the best choice. Yours was one of those times.


Bob, I know, I just had to throw that in. I agreed with you 100%. Now I need to shut my laptop down and restart it :yum:


murph