PDA

View Full Version : Lamb Chops tonight - do you marinade lamb?


Melensdad
03-05-2009, 03:18 PM
Somewhere I had seen a statistic that the 'average' American eats 1# of lamb per year. In my house that is accomplished about every other week, so we are clearly 'above average' here :brows: Clearly we are lamb lovers here!

Anyway, when we cook lamb, especially chops on the BBQ grill, we tend to marinate them and I'm looking for some new recipes for marinade, or perhaps even a dry rub?

In our case, we simply take a deep pan, pour in just enough olive oil to cover the bottom, add some freshly snipped and crushed rosemary leaves (maybe a teaspoon), add a large amount of crushed garlic --we love garlic so about a heaping tablespoon of fresh crushed garlic, and stir in some nice balsamic vinegar too. Then add a liberal amount of coarse salt. Mix it together and set the lambchops in the dish, making sure to flip them over and cover all the meat with some of the marinade. Cover the dish and set in the refrigerator for a couple hours or even prepare in the morning and leave them all day, flip them over a few times so they stay evenly coated.

When dinner time comes around, toss them on a hot BBQ grill and cook to medium rare :clap:

Anyone else prepare them any particular way?

Erik
03-05-2009, 05:26 PM
I'm more a leg man myself... :brows:
I score the leg, then rub in ground garlic & ginger.
Sometimes I'll do a marinade made from soy sauce, bourbon, and garlic, or maybe add some oriental 5 spice. (this is also my marinade for pork steaks)

daedong
03-05-2009, 06:19 PM
I'm more a leg man myself... :brows:
I score the leg, then rub in ground garlic & ginger.
Sometimes I'll do a marinade made from soy sauce, bourbon, and garlic, or maybe add some oriental 5 spice. (this is also my marinade for pork steaks)

Erik stab the leg with a sharp pointed knife and push cloves of garlic in close to the bone. An Aussie tradition is roast leg on Sundays for the midday meal.

daedong
03-05-2009, 06:39 PM
Bob lamb chops with marinade sound good . If I am ever back in the USA could I drop around for a feed! Oh I would like to bring CB with me as he always has lots of beer, so would that be OK.

Av8r3400
03-05-2009, 09:45 PM
I can honestly say I've never eaten lamb. :sad:

I would have no idea how to prepare it or even if I would like it.

Erik
03-05-2009, 11:28 PM
Vin, that sounds really good - I'll have to remember it next time I cook some up.

AV8R - I generally smoke the leg of lamb with an indirect mulberry fire. If you just want an idea of how it can taste, try an outback steakhouse - they serve a tarragon marinaded rack of lamb that's pretty good for chain food. (I refer to them as "lamb-pops" because that's kind of how they look - and how I eat them)
Price is too high - because that's the nature of the chain, but it's still decent vittles. (at least it used to be - haven't eaten there since I married a vegetarian... so now I cook my own at home where she doesn't have to smell the other 150 peoples' dinners.) :doh:

BigAl
03-05-2009, 11:45 PM
I can honestly say I've never eaten lamb. :sad:

I would have no idea how to prepare it or even if I would like it.


You DO NOT even want to know !!! God awful :sick::puke1:

Erik
03-06-2009, 12:07 AM
Lamb = tasty.
cold cooked lamb = not so tasty
mutton = not so tasty unless done absolutely right
goat = very tasty if done right. (marinate overnight, then slow cook/pit cook for about 10 hours)

pirate_girl
03-06-2009, 12:13 AM
goat???????????????????
oh my!!

thcri
03-06-2009, 12:17 AM
You DO NOT even want to know !!! God awful :sick::puke1:



One of the farms I worked on we had Lamb at least twice a week. The lady of the house made it pretty dam good. I would take her lamb over a good turkey or ham any day. Dang I miss her cooking. Always loved pops Pfeifer beer too, but he never knew I was drinking it. :hide:

Erik
03-06-2009, 12:20 AM
off topic -- potbellied pig is really good, too - but you have to cook if for about 36 hours and drain it frequently to get most of the grease out. (crock pot with wire basket comes in very handy here)

Melensdad
03-06-2009, 12:20 AM
goat = very tasty if done right. (marinate overnight, then slow cook/pit cook for about 10 hours)
I love goat burgers. Very very good, has that gamey taste that is missing in so many meats that have literally gone bland and are losing their flavor as production demand exceeds demand for quality flavor.

Vin is right about slipping cloves of garlic into a leg, we do that too. Its common among Easter Europeans, at least here in this area to slow roast garlic infused lamb (whole or bone in leg) over open pits and swab them down with salt water while it cooks.

I've never tried ginger on lamb. That might be very interesting. Fresh ginger? Ground dried ginger? Pickled (Japanese) ginger?

Erik
03-06-2009, 12:26 AM
I used fresh coarse ground/chopped ginger, but the pickled Japanese style stuff might be OK as well.
Bet the japanese style thin sliced (sushi) ginger would go good with the lamb after cooking - layers of thin slices of lamb with pickled ginger on toasted honey whole wheat or russian rye bread and maybe a couple slices of havarti or muenster cheese...

OTOH, you've got me wondering about using some of my pickled garlic in the next leg I cook, to see how that goes. (fresh cloves on one end, pickled on the other - see if it's a good difference or a bad one)