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bczoom
01-30-2006, 02:11 PM
Besides me...

For years they've been saying the mainframes are going away but they (and us mainframe programmers) are still here. :thumb:

beds
01-30-2006, 02:32 PM
Yup, I still do a bit on the old mainframe, but mostly server-side now. In our organization, the price of DASD has fallen so much that the old host isn't lookin' so costly! We still have postings for COBOL programmers.

Nothin' like the glory days at the turn of the century! How did I manage to squander all of that money!:eek:

kensfarm
01-30-2006, 02:33 PM
Worked w/ them while I was in college.. but most work since has been converting mainframe systems to client/server. Biggest one was for DOD DMLSS.. we had a 6 month run to help EDS make there contract deadlines in the system development.. we made the deadline.. contract renewed.. stayed there for about 6 years at Fort Detrick.

DaveNay
01-30-2006, 02:46 PM
I'm not a mainframe programmer....but I am a large-frame programmer. :yum:

Oh...and I stayed at a Holiday Inn last night.

bczoom
01-30-2006, 03:03 PM
Yup, I still do a bit on the old mainframe, but mostly server-side now. In our organization, the price of DASD has fallen so much that the old host isn't lookin' so costly! We still have postings for COBOL programmers.
Yep, DASD is cheap... and everyone has lots of it. The one application I'm on now has several terrabytes (that's trillion's) of info online. What I also find amazing is that they can put the entire contents of the MF on 3 cartridges for offsite backups.

Nothin' like the glory days at the turn of the century! How did I manage to squander all of that money!:eek:
The Y2K boom kind of ruined the consulting business for me.

beds
01-30-2006, 03:18 PM
The Y2K boom kind of ruined the consulting business for me.

Well, my rates dropped by, hmm, 50% post-Y2K! Is that what you mean?

What kind of programming do you do BC? I was doing COBOL and then SAS from hmm, '88 to '01, now mostly unix database stuff.

bczoom
01-30-2006, 03:25 PM
Well, my rates dropped by, hmm, 50% post-Y2K! Is that what you mean?
I joined a a very small consulting firm in the mid-90's. The company started in 1992. I think I was the 10th person. By 1999, there was over 400 of us. The founders sold the company just before Y2K for $89 million. They did very well. Unfortunately, the business dropped way off after Y2K. Most of the employees joined the clients. Well, the clients then became fully staffed so they didn't need consultants like they used to.

Post Y2K, our rates are about 65-70% of where they were beforehand.

What kind of programming do you do BC?
I do mainly COBOL/CICS in an MVS environment.

beds
01-30-2006, 03:31 PM
I do mainly COBOL/CICS in an MVS environment.

For a financial institute, maybe?:whistle:

bczoom
01-30-2006, 03:48 PM
For a financial institute, maybe?:whistle:
Bzzzzzzt

Close, but no. I do hospital systems. A big hospital will need a CPU as big as a bank. A friend of mine who's a systems programmer said his place is going to a 600 MIP (million instructions/second) machine and still expect it to run at close to 80% all day.

Doc
01-30-2006, 05:04 PM
Up until last year I was doing z/OS data collection for performace and sizing purposes (capacity planning). I'd process the SMF data with MXG (& SAS). Then I'd write SAS programs to extract the data in various views. I worked closely with the systems programmers.

Now I'm doing Unix adminstration. I build and deploy and administer systems for huge oracle databases 200g +. And, I have to admit, I enjoy the heck out of it. :)

beds
01-31-2006, 08:35 AM
Good for you Doc! Enjoying what you do doesn't make it seem so much like work! I really like that Oracle product myself. We moved away from Oracle to DB2, but for the wrong reasons.

jwstewar
02-06-2006, 06:27 PM
I used to code on the mainframe. I did COBOL/CICS w/ VSAM for Franklin County, Ohio. Somewhere along the line, I decided I was bored with the mainframe and moved over to the Client/Server world. So now I'm coding in Visual Basic and Microsoft SQL Server for medium sized/regional insurance company. I work on their claims system. Somewhere along the lines I figure I'll "brush-up" on my mainframe skillset and move back over there as all of old mainframers retire and they aren't training anyone on them any more. I figure at that point I can pretty much set my own salary.:D