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View Full Version : Improving the diesel MPG on a 2006 Ford ?


BigAl
05-31-2008, 06:25 PM
I now have 42000 mile on my 06 F250 4x4 diesel Crewcab Ford Truck . I just returned last night from a emergency road trip to Idaho and averaged 17.5 MPG for the trip . It has the 6.0 motor and has not given me one minute of trouble . Now the truck is completely stock and I have not tricked out anything to try to improve mileage .

I was talking with a couple of "good ole" boys at the local coffee shop the other day in Idaho and they both add a Cetane Fuel additive to their 2008 Ford and 2007 Chevy Duramax diesels engines . One guy has increased 3 miles per gallon on the Chevy and the Ford owner has a 4 mile increase . I known these guys for years and they don't make up stories , just to impress .

With Diesel now hitting $5.15 I was wondering if any of you other diesel truck owners are looking at trying to increase MPG and what may have worked for you ????

There seems to be a ton of stuff out there that claims unbelievable MPG increases . Air systems, Exhaust systems, Overdrives , Super chips ,just to name a few .

I'm not looking to change trucks . I like my Ford King Ranch . 17.5 MPG aint bad but squeezing out a few more MPG would not hurt my feelings .

Jump in here if you have any actual "hands on" knowledge on this .I would appreciate to hear your comments .

Tractors4u
05-31-2008, 07:16 PM
I got a Bully Dog Power Pup tuner for my Duramax. Everyday driving, stop and go type driving. I can get 17 MPG. Other than the tuner, the truck is a bone stock 2007 Duramax.

Deadly Sushi
05-31-2008, 11:51 PM
Hmmmmmm....

http://www.syntheticwarehouse.com/diesel_fuel_injector_additive.htm

http://www.bullydogshop.com/product/part_number=41562/663.0.256.2096.0.0.0

The Power Pup looks pricey.

Bulldog1401
06-01-2008, 07:28 PM
I have an edge evolution programmer on my 7.3 L. Increased 6 mpg across the board. And lots more power.

Av8r3400
06-02-2008, 01:06 PM
DO NOT ADD JUNK TO YOUR FUEL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

This crap will clog you particulate filter and cost you big $$$$$$$$$!!! If these guys are running it in their '07 and '08 trucks, they will soon be repairing/replacing their filters.

Getting a programmer (bypassing a lot of the EPA BS) will increase you economy and give you more power. However you can easily cook your motor (especially that 6.0 motor) with the power increase/operational parameter changes.

Freeing up the air filter & exhaust will help. the best way to improve the fuel economy is to slow down. 55 MPH will give you a drastic improvement over even 65 mph. At 55 my truck will get 22-23 mpg, where at 65-70 it drops to 16-17.

BigAl
06-02-2008, 07:11 PM
A good friend has a Super Chip that he used on his 2004 Ford 6.0 diesel . My truck is a 2006 Ford 6.0 diesel . Will it work on my truck ?? He sold his truck so I can just have it ,if I want . He paid $400 for it . Whatta you think ???

rback33
06-02-2008, 09:31 PM
A good friend has a Super Chip that he used on his 2004 Ford 6.0 diesel . My truck is a 2006 Ford 6.0 diesel . Will it work on my truck ?? He sold his truck so I can just have it ,if I want . He paid $400 for it . Whatta you think ???


Maybe, maybe not. I know they used to Vin lock them. Kinda of a one and done deal. Other than that, I THINK it would take the same one.

My suggestion would be to get a Dodge... :poke:

I want to get the edge juice for mine. One thing though.. I would NOT do anything without a pyrometer. Also... 4" exhaust helps too....

Where is Brent.. I know he knows a lot about this type of thing...

mtntopper
06-16-2008, 09:13 AM
I went with the Hypertech unit and set it at stage 2 which is medium hp gain. I am now getting about 3 more miles per gallon of diesel and have considerably more power. You can go to stage 3 for more gain but I don't want to do any damage and my goal was for better mpg on my Ford F350 King Ranch diesel. I have used it for about 4 months now and for the price of about $400.00 dollars, it will pay for itself soon in more mpg. I went from about 14/15 mpg to 17/18 mpg with the Hypertech upgrade in the 06 F350.

cj7
06-16-2008, 11:18 AM
Here is my suggestion.

Do some research on these two sites.

http://www.thedieselstop.com/forums/


www.ford-trucks.com/forums/index.php (http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/index.php)




There is plenty of disscusion on MPG's. I have an 01 with a 7.3 I run a Turbonetics Ball Bearing turbo, DP tuner on 80 econo (plus it has other tow settings), larger exhaust, large open air filter, 285 tires and 3.73 gears. The truck is an auto. Crew cab long bed F350 SRW 4x4

I usually tow with this truck but recently I did take a trip empty. I was able to get 18 to 19 out of it. So I got about a 1 to 2 mpg increase over stock. plus I have more power from the truck.

If you do get into chips and tuners you will want to consider other upgrades as well. Guages are important to monitor exhaust temp.

I did a ton of reading and thinking before I bought my parts. They have to work as a system. See what the other guys have been doing and the results they get. Pay attention to the little differences between builds.


As it was mentiond above slowing down is the best thing to do for mileage. As well as classic things like tire pressure and no jack rabbit starts etc.

fogtender
06-16-2008, 02:03 PM
If you preheat the fuel, it will burn cleaner and give you about 5 to 10 % better mileage and more power. I put a pre heater on My semi and went from about five GPM to about 7 GPM. Doesn't sound like much, but when you put three hundred gallons at a time in, it really adds up quickly on Two Thousand mile trips.

Found that when I was going into a place all the time to pick up 40,000+ Lbs. of freight and went back up out of the same hills, when the fuel was full and cold, I would go up in fourth gear, but when the fuel was hot from the "Normal" return fuel flow, the truck would go out in sixth gear. Installed a pyrometer, and the exhaust temps were about the same, except under a heavy load, where I would just back off some.

Built a fuel pre heater that ran off my engine water jacket and it saved me thousands in the course of a few years, and that was at about .90 cents a gallon...

Don't know how it will work on the new fuel with all the BTU's taken out of it, but it should show some improvement. Would add a half a quart of ATF per full tank to provide additional Lubrication over what was taken out for EPA crap... Which of course, is illegal to do...

Av8r3400
06-17-2008, 07:02 AM
Don't know how it will work on the new fuel with all the BTU's taken out of it, but it should show some improvement. Would add a half a quart of ATF per full tank to provide additional Lubrication over what was taken out for EPA crap... Which of course, is illegal to do...


Please explain the BTUs taken out of ULS diesel. The sulfur was a lubricity agent and added little if anything to the burn of the fuel. I have noticed little if any change in mileage with the ULS fuel. The blended fuels like a winter blend with more kerosene in it, has a lower BTU level.

Also, adding ATF to your fuel will quickly coke up your injectors and cause massive losses of power and efficiency in the spray pattern. Modern ATF is a synthetic oil and doesn't burn very well, if at all. Not a good practice. A product like "Power Service" or similar will work much better.

fogtender
06-17-2008, 12:39 PM
Please explain the BTUs taken out of ULS diesel. The sulfur was a lubricity agent and added little if anything to the burn of the fuel. I have noticed little if any change in mileage with the ULS fuel. The blended fuels like a winter blend with more kerosene in it, has a lower BTU level.

It use to be that you could get a #1 or #2 heating oil or diesel fuel (both are the same thing, one with road tax, one without). The #1 has less sulfur/paraffin and is better for winter use in as it doesn't "Jell" like #2 does in extreme cold. But it clearly has less power and my mileage in my Dodge Diesel Pickup dropped about three to four MPG during winter. #2 has the higher sulfur/paraffin content and the BTU's much higher (British Thermal Unit which is a measure of heat created), it also has better lubrication properties and will make the injectors last much longer.

The "New" diesel has even less than what #1 use to have and is much "Drier", that is why you will see on some of the pumps "Not recommended for older Diesel Engines" (because will/may score the injector/pumps), and why it is suppose to be "Illegal" for using "Old Diesel" in new trucks after 2007. Big difference in "Illegal" and "Won't work", it works fine, just the EPA emissions is a bit off when you get more power.


Also, adding ATF to your fuel will quickly coke up your injectors and cause massive losses of power and efficiency in the spray pattern. Modern ATF is a synthetic oil and doesn't burn very well, if at all. Not a good practice. A product like "Power Service" or similar will work much better.

Driver's have been using ATF for years in their diesel injection systems, it does add a lubrication to the system and dilutes to almost the same level of viscosity of the diesel.

Using Power Services is great too. In my shop guys would come in and want me to "Rebuild" their injectors/pumps because the engine would be running rough, I would sell them a couple of bottles of Power Services and tell them to run that for a few tanks first before spending a couple of Thousand of dollars they didn't need to spend. The Power Services would clean the injectors that were sticking and the engine would run just fine after a couple of tanks of fuel and they were happy.

I would not use Synthetic ATF, it may indeed clog the injectors. Regular AFT is fine and nothing but a clean refined oil that burns just as well as the other oils in a Diesel and it does keep the lacquer from building on the injectors/pump.

Bio Diesel is more of what I would be concerned about, you are using used cooking oil that has/may not have the lubrication properties that will allow your normal engine life to be obtained. If you do use it, I would at least make sure is it highly filtered. The Tolerances in a Diesel Injection system can be damaged by just fine dust, and/or finger prints if someone is working on them with dry fingers.

Here is a site that talks about Diesel Fuel, keep in mind that it is EXXON and they have to profess the "Legal" version of what you can use: http://www.exxon.com/USA-English/GFM/Products_Services/Fuels/Diesel_Fuels_FAQ.asp

Av8r3400
06-17-2008, 01:59 PM
(Disclaimer: I'm trying to learn things here, not argue. Please don't take this as an argument.)

One of the things my wife does for a living is manage the fuel for 130 OTR trucks in the company she works for. Therefore she has taught me quite a few things about diesel fuel from an operations standpoint. I've been driving diesels exclusively since the 80's. (Kubota, Chevies, Fords, Cummins-Dodge and TDi VW's.)


It use to be that you could get a #1 or #2 heating oil or diesel fuel (both are the same thing, one with road tax, one without).

Agreed.

The #1 has less sulfur/paraffin and is better for winter use in as it doesn't "Jell" like #2 does in extreme cold. Paraffin, maybe, but the sulfur level was a mandated level, the same for both, even before LSD or ULSD came around.

But it clearly has less power and my mileage in my Dodge Diesel Pickup dropped about three to four MPG during winter. #2 has the higher sulfur/paraffin content and the BTU's much higher (British Thermal Unit which is a measure of heat created), it also has better lubrication properties and will make the injectors last much longer.Mine too. Winter blends of #1 and #2 will have (before and after the ULSD came around) less BTU energy the regular #2. I have not been convinced by anything that I have read or heard, (yet) that this has anything to do with the sulfur content. #1 is a lighter fuel (more kerosene-like) than #2.

The lubricity factor is unarguable to be sure, and in that sense there my be some loss of power/efficiency due to the parasitic drag in the engine. But I don't believe that this loss is in the combustion of the sulfur.


The "New" diesel has even less than what #1 use to have and is much "Drier", that is why you will see on some of the pumps "Not recommended for older Diesel Engines" (because will/may score the injector/pumps), and why it is suppose to be "Illegal" for using "Old Diesel" in new trucks after 2007. Big difference in "Illegal" and "Won't work", it works fine, just the EPA emissions is a bit off when you get more power.Old diesel in new trucks will not work due to particulate filters on the exhaust getting clogged by soot. New diesel in "old" motors will probably not cause an issue because most of the injection systems made in the last 20 years use hardened internal parts making this *mostly* a non-issue.

Does it help to ad something to the fuel on a older motor? Probably, but it wouldn't be mandatory, IMO.

Driver's have been using ATF for years in their diesel injection systems, it does add a lubrication to the system and dilutes to almost the same level of viscosity of the diesel. I would not use Synthetic ATF, it may indeed clog the injectors. Regular AFT is fine and nothing but a clean refined oil that burns just as well as the other oils in a Diesel and it does keep the lacquer from building on the injectors/pump.But synthetic ATF WILL coke injectors and piston crowns. If you can find a non-synthetic ATF, let me know where because I can't.

Using Power Services is great too. In my shop guys would come in and want me to "Rebuild" their injectors/pumps because the engine would be running rough, I would sell them a couple of bottles of Power Services and tell them to run that for a few tanks first before spending a couple of Thousand of dollars they didn't need to spend. The Power Services would clean the injectors that were sticking and the engine would run just fine after a couple of tanks of fuel and they were happy.Probably from ATF.. :shifty:

Bio Diesel is more of what I would be concerned about, you are using used cooking oil that has/may not have the lubrication properties that will allow your normal engine life to be obtained. If you do use it, I would at least make sure is it highly filtered. The Tolerances in a Diesel Injection system can be damaged by just fine dust, and/or finger prints if someone is working on them with dry fingers.Some have said that the lubricity in bio-oil is much higher and better for diesel injection systems. I don't know. WVO is scary due to contamination issues, mostly.

fogtender
06-17-2008, 02:33 PM
(Disclaimer: I'm trying to learn things here, not argue. Please don't take this as an argument.)

One of the things my wife does for a living is manage the fuel for 130 OTR trucks in the company she works for. Therefore she has taught me quite a few things about diesel fuel from an operations standpoint. I've been driving diesels exclusively since the 80's. (Kubota, Chevies, Fords, Cummins-Dodge and TDi VW's.)

I drove and started rebuilding them since about the late 60's and have seen just about every form of distroyed fuel system you can imagine. You have to remember if your wife is working in the industry. She is mandated to do what is "Legal" and can't devate from that and all her training from the company is going to reflect that also. I am sure she is very good at what she does, she just isn't allowed any variances, otherwise you may have to sneak a file in a cake to where she would be parked at for awhile.



But synthetic ATF WILL coke injectors and piston crowns. If you can find a non-synthetic ATF, let me know where because I can't.

Well synthetic ATF will cost almost ten to fifteen bucks a quart or more, regular AFT is about the cost of what a quart of motor oil goes for, which is about three bucks a quart now.


Probably from ATF..

Most of the guys that had "bad" injectors didn't do anything but drive their trucks for years with nothing but filter changes and engine oil changes, ATF would have been a good thing for them.


Some have said that the lubricity in bio-oil is much higher and better for diesel injection systems. I don't know. WVO is scary due to contamination issues, mostly.

The unknown is that you don't know if it has water in it or whatelse they dumped in to the oil before you get it.

Then there is that terrible smell of donuts when you drive behind them... so you start freaking out and look for a cop car in the area....

DAP
07-04-2008, 06:08 PM
A good friend has a Super Chip that he used on his 2004 Ford 6.0 diesel . My truck is a 2006 Ford 6.0 diesel . Will it work on my truck ?? He sold his truck so I can just have it ,if I want . He paid $400 for it . Whatta you think ???

Al ... I will say this and for what its worth ... if I was looking at used diesels, which for a while I was, if a saw a chipped motor, I walked away. Same holds true if I see a modified air intake system. Right or wrong, there are many others who think like I do about that. Point being, be careful if you're considering resale values by putting a chip on your rig. Ya just never can know how that motor was handled.

I understand how the chips work and why someone would benefit from ramming more air into their engine, but if I'm gonna have a truck with that equipment on it, it will be because I put it there.

People DO cook em up sometimes.

:punk:

BigAl
07-04-2008, 06:30 PM
Al ... I will say this and for what its worth ... if I was looking at used diesels, which for a while I was, if a saw a chipped motor, I walked away. Right or wrong, there are many others who think like I do about that. Point being, be careful if you're considering resale values by putting a chip on your rig. Ya just never can know how that motor was handled.

People DO cook em up sometimes.

:punk:

Your timing on this is scary. My good friend just dropped off that Super Chip a few days ago .He told me again he was not that impressed with the product . I then read the brochure and there is No way in hell I would put that on my truck . I even called the factory and the so called "Tech" expert I talked to ,could not even give me a straight answer on anything . I think he may have been a Democrate too:furious: .
Now my next door nieghbor ,who is an expert on nothing ,got one($400) and told me how great it is . I had to load it for him :doh:....... He said the performace on his 2007 Dodge Deisel is unbelievable now and his mileage has increase from 15MPG on the open road to almost 15MPG on the open road .... :doh::doh::doh:!!!
I went down to Auto Zone and after reading the labels on half a dozen different brands of Cetane additive ,bought a bottle that is to treat 100 gals of deisel for about $7 bucks.

On this last trip to Idaho I tried it out both ways to see the difference . At 55-60 miles per hour going up I got 19 miles per gallon . At 75 miles per hour coming back with the AC on and the stereo blasting I still got my old 17.5 MPH . The same as I got before adding the Cetane booster :shock:.

So the MPG increase was due to slowing down ,not the Cetane additive . At least I did not blow $400 bucks to find out .

Problem is you can't always tell if a motor has been chipped because the smart guys will reprogram the motor back to factory specs before selling it .

fogtender
07-04-2008, 06:33 PM
Al ... I will say this and for what its worth ... if I was looking at used diesels, which for a while I was, if a saw a chipped motor, I walked away. Same holds true if I see a modified air intake system. Right or wrong, there are many others who think like I do about that. Point being, be careful if you're considering resale values by putting a chip on your rig. Ya just never can know how that motor was handled.

I understand how the chips work and why someone would benefit from ramming more air into their engine, but if I'm gonna have a truck with that equipment on it, it will be because I put it there.

People DO cook em up sometimes.

:punk:

As a general rule, most people that buy diesel trucks aren't into performance for street racing...

But you will find a lot of them that have opened up the intake and exhaust systems to let the breath better and they do preform better with a lot better mileage if you do keep your foot out of it.

I put a special air filter on my truck (Gas) and it gave me almost one MPG better mileage, not much maybe, but when you add all the other little tidbits, it does add up.

If you were really concerned on how it was ran, you can take an oil sample and have it tested. It will tell you what kind of metals are in the oil from wear. If you have a lot of copper, then you know that the Babbitt has worn down and it is wearing into the copper under it. They can also tell if a lot of other items are showing wear too.

I would be more concerned how it feels on the road, is the steering loose, pulls to one side, the brakes feel strong and so forth.

Diesel engines now days are going to go 300,000 miles with no problems (major) on the average.... the truck may rust out, but the engine will still drag the chassis along...

The chips do add preformance, but the factory ones lowers the power/emissions to meet the federal regulations, the aftermarket ones in crease performance but also increase fuel mileage (if you keep your foot out of it) and would flunk an IM test that many states have. So you would need to put the old one back for those tests...

One of the kids that works for me has a chip in his 03 Dodge Diesel, it adds about 80 HP and he can really tell it, if he keeps his foot out of it, the mileage has gone up to about 20 from 17... But he is 18 and keeping the foot out isn't part of his thought process yet..