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View Full Version : YORKSHIRE PUDDINGS.


Spock
04-23-2008, 07:05 AM
Yorkshire puddings are tradition here in the UK to have with a Sunday roast dinner.....served with roast beef roast potatoes vegetables and gravy.

Problem is most people here in the UK aint a clue on how to cook them just right which crispy.....so here's my guide to great Yorkshire puddings.

Very simple.....

grab a cup and do equal measurements of these ingredients....

cup of plain white flour

cup of eggs

cup of milk

whisk till smooth

heat the oven to 250 nice and hot

put a little cooking oil in to each segment of a baking tray and place in the oven to heat up nice and hot


remove the tray and fill each segment with the mixture

return to oven and cook for 25 min "DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR UNTIL COOKING TIME IS COMPLETE OR THEY WILL NOT RISE"

after the 25 min cooking time remove from oven and serve.

perfect every time.

Av8r3400
04-23-2008, 07:14 AM
I'm at a loss as to what that would taste like. Is this meant as a side dish or a dessert? Eggs, flour and milk sounds more like an omelet or something than a pudding. Shouldn't there be sugar or something sweet in there?

Spock
04-23-2008, 07:21 AM
I'm at a loss as to what that would taste like. Is this meant as a side dish or a dessert? Eggs, flour and milk sounds more like an omelet or something than a pudding. Shouldn't there be sugar or something sweet in there?

They go on your plate with your roast dinner and taste crispy and need to be dunked in your gravy.....have to try to them to understand them.


no sugar or anything just keep it simple ....as we know the best things in life are.

Mith
04-23-2008, 08:42 AM
I've not ever managed to make them well, buy the Aunt bessies ones, much easier eh :D

You'd ruin them with sugar Av8r, treat them the same as you would roast potatoes for example. I think their original purpose was to used as an edible plate, some people make them big enough so your whole meal goes inside them, and the gravy pools inside, then you eat them as the last bit of the meal.

PBinWA
04-23-2008, 08:57 AM
I like them with lots of butter! Now I'm craving them.

Spock
04-23-2008, 08:58 AM
must add they are great cold with jam on them.

Doc
04-23-2008, 09:36 AM
Good post Kimi. I had heard of Yorkshire pudding but had no clue what it was. I thought it was a dessert like pudding on this side of the big pond.

Do you have "Jello" brand instant pudding and jello type desserts in England?

Spock
04-23-2008, 09:44 AM
Good post Kimi. I had heard of Yorkshire pudding but had no clue what it was. I thought it was a dessert like pudding on this side of the big pond.

Do you have "Jello" brand instant pudding and jello type desserts in England?

we have Jelly here which is the same thing.....in most cases kids here have Jelly and Ice cream for a pudding....with Strawberry Jelly being the chosen favourite.

Jelly is also a favourite in trifles here......jelly base set custard on top of that then cream on top of that and sprinkles ....yum yum gonna have to make one now.

by they way in the jelly base of the trifle we add what we call lady finger biscuits for an added crunch.

Spock
04-23-2008, 10:35 AM
Yorkshire puddings are tradition here in the UK to have with a Sunday roast dinner.....served with roast beef roast potatoes vegetables and gravy.

Problem is most people here in the UK aint a clue on how to cook them just right which crispy.....so here's my guide to great Yorkshire puddings.

Very simple.....

grab a cup and do equal measurements of these ingredients....

cup of plain white flour

cup of eggs

cup of milk

whisk till smooth

heat the oven to 250 nice and hot

put a little cooking oil in to each segment of a baking tray and place in the oven to heat up nice and hot


remove the tray and fill each segment with the mixture

return to oven and cook for 25 min "DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR UNTIL COOKING TIME IS COMPLETE OR THEY WILL NOT RISE"

after the 25 min cooking time remove from oven and serve.

perfect every time.

i should have said the heat setting is 250C i think that's about 480F correct me if im wrong.

Av8r3400
04-23-2008, 10:41 AM
English to American Translations:

Pudding = Dessert
Jelly = Jell-O or Jellaten
Tea = Afternoon snack at 4 pm.

Your description of Yorkshire Pudding would equate to a biscuit here in America. (Which would be a cracker in the UK, right?)

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

Spock
04-23-2008, 10:51 AM
English to American Translations:

Pudding = Dessert
Jelly = Jell-O or Jellaten
Tea = Afternoon snack at 4 pm.

Your description of Yorkshire Pudding would equate to a biscuit here in America. (Which would be a cracker in the UK, right?)

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

it's funny because when things are translated they don't always come up with what it really is.....

in a sense its like a thin crispy bread in a bowl shape.....but can also be cooked like a flat bread.....if we translate that as well then we are fooked and will come up with something else:rolf2:

sorry i cant explain better.....proof is in the pudding....damn i'm off again.

PBinWA
04-23-2008, 10:54 AM
Your description of Yorkshire Pudding would equate to a biscuit here in America. (Which would be a cracker in the UK, right?)


They are eaten similar to biscuits - with dinner (not for breakfast with crappy white gravy) usually Roast Beef with dark gravy. They are kind of crunchy on the outside and a little spongy and usually hollow on the inside. Spongy in a good way though.

:thumb:

Spock
04-23-2008, 10:56 AM
They are eaten similar to biscuits - with dinner (not for breakfast with crappy white gravy) usually Roast Beef with dark gravy. They are kind of crunchy on the outside and a little spongy and usually hollow on the inside. Spongy in a good way though.

:thumb:

now that's what i was trying to say...thanks PB

pirate_girl
04-23-2008, 11:20 AM
I could never master Yorkshire puddings.
They seem to go flat or burn lol
They are basically pancake batter, poured into hot tins, they should puff up like a popover with a hole in the center.
Good with onion gravy:thumb:

Hey Kimi, I make an excellent veggie version of toad-in-the-hole.:smile:

Spock
04-23-2008, 12:46 PM
Hey Kimi, I make an excellent veggie version of toad-in-the-hole.:smile:

i love toad-in-the-hole and so do the kids.....forget the veggie version gotta have good quality Lincolnshire sauages and some mashed potatoes with onion gravy......

DAMN I'm hungry

Erik
04-23-2008, 12:56 PM
toad in the hole anything like scotch eggs?boiled egg surrounded by sausage then batered and deep fried?

Spock
04-23-2008, 01:03 PM
toad-in-the-hole is Yorkshire pudding mixture tipped over sausages and cooked in the oven till risen and crispy.

if you do this then start the sausages off first on their own for 10 min in the oven....tip over the Yorkshire mixture and cook till risen and well browned and crispy on top.....like with cooking Yorkshire puddings "dont open the oven door until done".....if the door is opened the whole thing will flop.

nice hot oven 250C.

lilnixon
04-23-2008, 01:28 PM
John has put his order in.. I will have to make them very soon. Thanks for directions. I was thinking about making them the other day.
Janelle

PBinWA
04-23-2008, 01:30 PM
In case you yanks missed it:

250 degrees Celsius = 482 degrees Fahrenheit

pixie
04-23-2008, 06:36 PM
My mother made Yorkshire pudding for every holiday. She usually used roast beef fat drippings for the fat. I like it !!!

We always called them pop-overs when they are made in those muffin tins.

I've worked in a restaurant where we served pop-overs and kept them warm in a paper bag which is a good way to reheat them.